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Brain Scans Show That Eating Certain Types of Fish Can Help Boost Memory and Protect Against Alzheimer’s

Brain Scans Show That Eating Certain Types of Fish Can Help Boost Memory and Protect Against Alzheimer’s


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The study says it’s the first time brain scans were able to demonstrate the value of nutritional intervention for brain health

Previous research found that omega-3 fatty acids might prevent or treat brain-related conditions.

Brain scans from a new study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease show that eating a lot of salmon, mackerel, and sardines might help improve memory, boost overall mental and emotional health, and prevent Alzheimer’s.

The study found that those who consumed omega-3 fatty acids from oily fish had increased blood flow in areas of the brain that controlled learning and memory, meaning those who consume more of certain types of fish are able to understand new information better.

“Although we have considerable evidence that omega-3 levels are associated with better cardiovascular health, the role of the 'fish oil' fatty acids in mental health and brain physiology is just beginning to be explored,” William S. Harris, a co-author of the study and professor at the University of South Dakota School of Medicine, said. “This study opens the door to the possibility that relatively simple dietary changes could favorably impact cognitive function.”

To read about six kinds of fat and which foods are highest in them, click here.


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  


Jacky Parker Photography / Getty Images

Eating strawberries, blueberries, and acai fruit have been correlated with multiple benefits for our brains, with studies demonstrating improved memory in children as young as 8 to 10 years old and all the way through older adulthood.

For example, one study published in 2013 found that participants who ate a greater amount of berries experienced a slower cognitive decline, of up to 2.5 years difference, as they aged.   In people with mild cognitive impairment, another study published in 2011 found that drinking wild blueberry juice was associated with improved cognitive functioning.  



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