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These Foods Can Help You Stay Alert on Long, Long Drives

These Foods Can Help You Stay Alert on Long, Long Drives


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You know caffeinated drinks like coffee and tea will help, but here are some other options

iStock / Thinkstock

When we think of road trips, we think of fun, excitement, novelty. And then, when we’re on the road, we feel the F word: fatigue. While the United States is all the more beautiful for its vast swaths of land, staying focused on the road for hours on end can be challenging. Is it worth the trip? Absolutely! Especially if you’re snacking healthy and keeping yourself alert enough to enjoy it all. Here are nine foods that will help you do that.

These Foods Can Help You Stay Alert on Long, Long Drives

iStock / Thinkstock

When we think of road trips, we think of fun, excitement, novelty. Here are nine foods that will help you do that.

Chia Seeds

Chia seeds are pretty much the best (and simplest) thing you can bring on the road with you, because not only do they keep you energized, but they also hydrate you. “Chia seeds absorb nine to 12 times their weight in water,” says dietician Tanya Zuckerbrot, due to their hydrophilic properties (they are attracted to water). Instead of spending money on a sugar-heavy chia juice at the supermarket, just add a few chia seeds to water and squeeze some lime into it; this creates chia fresca, or iskiate. The Aztecs believed that chia seeds could sustain warriors for up to 24 hours.

Chocolate

Dark chocolate cocoa nibs contain an ingredient called theobromine, which is a stimulant similar to, but less harsh than, caffeine, so it makes for less of a crash. Make sure you’re going for very dark chocolate, though; milk chocolate contains a lot of sugar and will lead to a crash. Also, eat chocolate in moderation — it’s a filling snack, and you don’t want that weighed-down feeling in your stomach.

Cinnamon

When you’re tired of driving and need pick-me-up, try cinnamon: Even a whiff of the spice will “boost your brain activity,” according to the The World’s Healthiest Foods organization. A research study showed that smelling cinnamon increased awareness, virtual recognition memory, working memory, and visual-motor speed. Chewing cinnamon gum is a good idea, and so is packing some of these apple cinnamon walnut muffins.

Eggs

These versatile breakfast staples are high in protein, so they keep you feeling full and alert. But that’s not all! Eggs contain choline, which aids brain function, helping you feel sharp as a tack. So now you know why so many rest stop shopssell hard-boiled eggs. You could also request some hard-boiled eggs to go at any roadside diner orbreakfast chain you stop by.

Marmite

Steve Cordory / Shutterstock

Marmite is probably easier to get hold of on a road trip through the United Kingdom or Australia (where you’ll find the similar Vegemite), but spread some of this on a piece of bread and you’ll certainly be alert. Nutritionist Dale Pinnock says that marmite, with its high concentration of B vitamins, is directly involved in creating energy at a cellular level. A small spread of the bitter stuff, which is made from brewer's yeast extract, on your morning toast can also support the central nervous system during times of stress — say, when you’re hopelessly lost on the road and your GPS is broken. It might be worth ordering some online before your American road trip.

Nuts

Nuts, specifically almonds and walnuts, are easily portable, widely available, and healthy snacks to bring along for the ride. According to nutritionist Alissa Rumsey, raw, unsalted almonds are a great source of healthy fat and protein that will keep your energy levels up throughout the day. Try making walnut granola with ginger — a natural stimulant that will also keep you awake — at home, and, if available, add yogurt from the rest stop to make it a parfait.

Popcorn

Thinkstock

While it may not be the easiest food to clean up after, popcorn — the non-buttered kind — makes you feel full without weighing down your stomach, so you can drive along with a fiber-rich but low-calorie boost of energy. Since microwaves aren’t easy to come by on the road, go for packaged popcorn, or, better yet, pack some in airtight containers before you leave your house. Better yet, skip the microwave altogether and experiment with flavors — like Negroni caramel — or make easily portable popcorn balls.

Sweet Potatoes

The average sweet potato contains just 112 calories, but packs 28 grams of complex (or “good”) carbs that will help your brain produce extra glucose and give you a big burst of energy. There are many road trip-friendly ways to enjoy sweet potatoes. Make a large batch of homemade sweet potato chips and put them in Ziploc bags, or incorporate them into chocolate spice bars.

Water-Rich Fruits

iStock / Thinkstock

Nutritionist Tori Holthaus of YES! Nutrition recommends water-rich foods like berries, pineapple, cucumber, and watermelon for easy hydration, especially along with water-rich breakfasts like oatmeal. Don’t just enjoy these while driving; perhaps stop somewhere scenic, cut a watermelon for the whole family to share, and enjoy a view like this.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.


5 Healthy Foods That Are Keeping You Up at Night

We don&apost have to explain to you why diving into a plate of jalapeno nachos or a pint of rocky road during dinner will likely make it hard to fall asleep later in the night. Greasy or spicy food can bloat you out and leave you too uncomfortable to nod off, and the added sugar in ice cream can also keep you from drifting into dreamland.

So while it&aposs smart to stay away from those foods within 4-6 hours of your bedtime, you might not be aware of some otherwise healthy dinner options that can sneakily keep you tossing and turning all night. These are the five most surprising insomnia offenders in your kitchen, according to nutritionists.

Hard cheese

One serving of cheese equals roughly one thin sandwich-size slice or a couple of dice-size cubes most of us probably eat a lot more than that in one sitting, however, and it keeps us from scoring quality sleep.

𠇌heeses higher in saturated fat such as Swiss, cheddar, blue, and parmesan can be challenging to digest, especially when you&aposre laying down,” says Los Angeles�sed nutritionist Maggie Moon, MS, RD, author of The MIND Diet. Then there&aposs the risk of hearburn. “Laying down too soon after eating them can make it easier for acid reflux to happen, causing discomfort and burning in the chest,” she explains.

If you do crave some cheese, plan on turning in for the night 4 to 6 hours after eating it, Moon advises. And if it&aposs dairy that you&aposre actually craving, a good alternative is a warm glass of milk, which really can help you fall asleep thanks to the amino acid tryptophan, which some say can help relax you.

Dark chocolate

You’re reaching for dessert and probably think half a regular-size bar of dark chocolate is healthier than a slice of cheesecake𠅊nd it is. But that chocolate poses more of a threat at bedtime.

�rk chocolate can be a polyphenol-rich treat, but it’s also a surprising source of caffeine," says Moon. "It’s common to avoid beverages like coffee or caffeinated tea before bed, but it’s just as important to avoid food sources of this stimulant, which can make it hard to fall and stay asleep,” Moon explains.

A square or two of dark chocolate has about a quarter of the caffeine as a cup of coffee, and about half the caffeine as a cup of green or black tea, Moon says. “Keep in mind that some of us are genetically fast caffeine metabolizers, and others are slow metabolizers—meaning caffeine stays in the body longer and has more side effects. Unless you&aposre sure you&aposre a fast metabolizer, stay away from the dark chocolately stuff.

In general, “it takes 6 to 10 hours to eliminate caffeine, so that means enjoy a dark chocolate treat no later than noon to four pm for a 10 pm bedtime,” she advises. A good alternative is tart cherry juice with a few walnuts. Both provide melatonin to help regulate sleep and promote drowsiness.

A juicy hamburger

Beef is an excellent protein and iron source. But the protein and fat in the typical burger can take a while to digest, says Moon. For that reason, any dense, beefy dish should be avoided at least four hours before you plan to hit the sheets. “Ground beef in a burger or stroganoff is too heavy and hard to digest close to bedtime due to its high saturated fat and protein content,” she explains.

For a leaner protein alternative, try grilled chicken or turkey breast, which has way less saturated fat. “Ounce per ounce, a 70/30 ground beef patty has about 12 times the saturated fat as light turkey meat, and that&aposs even after it&aposs cooked and nearly 40% of the fat has been drained away,” Moon explains.

Matcha-infused snacks and foods

Macha is a powdered form of green tea, and this buzzy product has been added to cookies, smoothies, stir-frys, and more. “Trendy matcha snacks are all the rage these days for multiple reasons they&aposve got a pretty color, [and] they&aposre supposedly filled with antioxidants,” says San Diego�sed nutritionist Elizabeth Shaw, MS, RDN.

Yet there&aposs a drawback. Matcha snacks can have approximately 30 grams of sugar per serving, says Shaw the American Heart Association advises that women limit their intake of added sugar to no more than 25 grams per day. That&aposs because "excessive intake over time can cause spikes in blood sugar levels that then result in a steep drop and usually feelings of extreme hunger. You may wake up in the middle of the night jonsing for another donut or snack,” she explains.

Plus, green tea contains caffeine, roughly the same amount as in a cup of brewed coffee—so falling asleep won&apost be so easy. A sugar- and caffeine-free option? Pistachios. Like matcha, pistachios contain antioxidants, as well as monosaturated fat, protein, and fiber, which can keep you fuller longer and keep you from waking up hungry.

Cold cuts and processed meat

If your idea of an evening meal includes the processed sandwich meat you can pick up at any grocery or convenince store, we&aposve got some news for you. Because of their high sodium count, these products can leave you feeling bloated, and retaining fluids before bed causes sleep-stealing discomfort, says Shaw. Also, you might be thirstier after consuming sodium-rich foods, making you drink more in the hours before bed. and interrupt your sleep with bathroom runs.

“I recommend clients focus on a lower-sodium alternative that still packs a punch of protein, like natural peanut butter,” she says. A tablespoon or two over an apple should fill you up and keep hunger pangs at bay all night long.



Comments:

  1. Devere

    In this something is I seem this the excellent idea. I agree with you.

  2. Seignour

    Usually it takes half a year



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