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What Happens if You Drink Hand Sanitizer?

What Happens if You Drink Hand Sanitizer?


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Let’s just say that you probably don’t want to do it

"For topical use only."

We know that alcohol gets you drunk. So… thanks to the transitive property, hand sanitizer should get you drunk, too, right? Well… technically, yes, but that doesn’t mean that you should drink it.

The fatal flaw in the (minimal) thought process of people who want to drink hand sanitizer is the fact that there are several different types of alcohol out there. Ethanol is the type of alcohol in beer, wine, and spirits. Isopropyl alcohol is the type of alcohol used in hand sanitizer and rubbing alcohol, and consuming it has a couple downsides. One, it could be denatured, which means that it’s been chemically adulterated so it’s toxic and can make you really sick.

Two, while drinking isopropyl alcohol in excess can result in drunkenness, it can also result in nervous system damage as well as blindness and organ damage. In the rare cases when ethanol is used in hand sanitizer, it’s most definitely been denatured. Also, a 240 milliliter bottle of hand sanitizer contains the equivalent of about five shots of liquor, which can be quite a lot to handle for someone not used to regularly drinking.

So, in short, if you manage to down an entire bottle of hand sanitizer, there’s a good chance that you will end up feeling intoxicated. You may also end up in the hospital, however, or worse. Needless to say, we wouldn’t advise it.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


People Are Drinking Hand Sanitizer, Causing at Least 4 to Die and Others to Suffer Serious Complications

An alarming new CDC report cited several cases of people ingesting a product that's only supposed to be applied to skin.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is warning people not to drink hand sanitizer after several have become sick and even died from the practice.

"Alcohol-based hand sanitizer products should never be ingested," the CDC said in a new report released earlier this week. The report detailed that, from May 1 through June 30, there were 15 cases of methanol poisoning in Arizona and New Mexico, after people between the ages of 21 and 65 swallowed alcohol-based hand sanitizers. Four patients died, and three were discharged from the hospital with “visual impairment.” Others suffered from seizures.

The CDC report specifically mentioned a 44-year-old man who said he drank hand sanitizer a few days before seeking help. He ended up hospitalized for six days for acute methanol poisoning and was discharged with “near-total” vision loss, the report says.

This report focused on hand sanitizers that contained methanol, a toxic form of alcohol. To be effective against bacteria and viruses, including the new coronavirus, sanitizers should contain at least 60% ethanol alcohol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients, states the CDC. (Benzalkonium chloride may also help, but the CDC lists it as “less reliable” against certain bacteria and viruses.)

In June, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned people against using hand sanitizers that contain methanol. “Methanol is not an acceptable ingredient for hand sanitizers and should not be used due to its toxic effects,” the FDA wrote in anꂭvisory. The FDA originally cited nine different brands that used methanol in their hand sanitizer, but that list has since expanded.

It’s not clear why people decided to drink hand sanitizer in these situations, and the CDC didn’t offer up details. But it could be that people are misunderstanding the CDC and FDA advisories about hand sanitizer, or fear of contracting COVID-19 is leading people to make risky decisions when it comes to staying safe.


Watch the video: 25 χρήσεις του οξυζενέ


Comments:

  1. Radmund

    I do not know how to whom, I liked it!

  2. Marvin

    We will talk.

  3. Gor

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are not right. Let's discuss it.

  4. Madelhari

    Sure version :)



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