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Low Cow Releases New Low-Cal Ice Cream Pints $1.51 Cheaper Than Halo Top

Low Cow Releases New Low-Cal Ice Cream Pints $1.51 Cheaper Than Halo Top


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Moo-ve Over Halo Top, there's a new low-calorie ice cream in town

Tatomm/istockphoto.com

Simple Truth has released a new low-calorie “lite” ice cream called Low Cow. Each flavor is non-GMO, gluten-free, and high in protein and contains no artificial ingredients or preservatives, according to a statement on Simple Truth’s site. This new product bears a striking resemblance to Halo Top but costs about $1.50 less.

Can Low Cow live up to Halo Top’s legacy? The staff at PopSugar held a taste test to see for themselves.

“The general consensus was pretty darn positive,” they wrote. “The texture, though, was definitely not that of regular ice cream and left a little something to be desired.”

Fan favorites were birthday cake (it was described as “super bomb!” but lost points for powdery texture) and sea salt caramel (for great flavor and a deep appreciation for salt). Some others had aftertastes of fake sugar and the same strange texture. Lemon cake finished in last place for tasting like “creamy floor cleaner.”

Low Cow is available for purchase in Kroger stores nationwide, but if you’re not worried so much about calories, check out the 12 biggest, most over-the-top ice cream sundaes.


How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

How the Best Marketing Tactics Can Destroy a Business

Travel sites, bloggers, clothing companies, and that weird knickknack place where you bought that cat coffee mug—each battle for your attention.

Three spirited men recently battled for my attention: Jason Capital, Garrett White, and Mike Cernovich. Out of those three, two still battle for my attention, one doing so almost hourly. And these two spirited men use standard, popular, and dependable marketing tactics. In fact, they even teach these tactics to entrepreneurs and businesses.

The first two hammered my inbox using faithful email marketing tactics like curiosity-triggering headlines, body copy that deployed promises, open-loops, and scarcity. Through all of this, they tried to coerce me to click a link. When I clicked, they shoved me to sales pages that hit me with more faithful and popular sales tactics, like reason-why copy, raising curiosity, problem selling, social proof, claims, big promises, and blatant selling.

But the other guy took a different approach. He showed up like Clint Eastwood in a Western: self-assured and credible. He sent a simple yet potent email. One email. His sales page stands as one of the best I’ve seen, read, and studied. Those three guys who are battling for my attention exemplify the good, the bad, and the ugly of how marketing tactics can either help or hurt a business.

We exist in a direct marketing world. Daily, we’re on the receiving end of direct marketing tactics and strategy. Social media, Amazon, company landing pages, blogs, podcasts: direct marketing occurs nearly everywhere in our lives. Direct marketing, in short, is marketing aimed at an individual. This marketing style tries to foster a one-to-one selling environment. Our email inbox exhibits a prime example of direct marketing.

Today, any business—or person—can pick, stack, and deploy countless direct marketing tactics to grow a business or sell more products. Tactics—like funnels, copywriting, conversion algorithms, landing pages, segmenting, influencer marketing, content marketing, targeted ads, media buying, video sales letters, newsletters, sales letters, texts, and too-many-to-list methods—can raise a business’s chances of succeeding.

Similarly, entire industries now exist on the backs of those tactics. You can buy an online course on copywriting, or a major corporation can hire an MIT calculus whiz kid to head their media buying analytics team. And that vast tactic arsenal is now available to anyone—or any business—at practically any price range. What costs a fortune to a blogger and what costs a fortune to Proctor and Gamble can be spent on utilizing, testing, and deploying direct marketing tactics. Although direct marketing tactics wield immense selling power, they can also destroy your business.

Marketing, of course, matters. Any company or business, from a single blogger to a Fortune 500 company, requires sound marketing. Shrewd marketing helps build and sustain a business. Today, we can track the results of many marketing methods, and this helps businesses see both opportunities and advantages.

Businesses can no longer say, “Well, we ran an ad, and it seems like more people came in!” Detailed testing, analytics, and metrics now determine how strong or weak an ad performed. We see the results instantly. For example, in the 1980s, it took weeks to see how a split-tested ad in a newspaper performed. Today, depending on the traffic source and size, you can run 24 split tests, creating a virtual split-testing playoff bracket, starting at 7:00 a.m. By 9:00 a.m., you’ll have a clear frontrunner to send to your entire email list.

On the other end, if you’re not split testing 24 headlines and you created your first website, you can quickly split test your landing page copy. As you develop your business, you can quickly and cheaply develop your copy skill and learn what ad copy, what terms and phrases, best suit your business—a vital tool now available to anyone who’s never written copy.

Undoubtedly, marketing tactics and metrics play a vital role for any business. The tactics can offer alluring profits, and the metrics provide addictive measurements. But underneath the surface lies a landmine—we often lose sight of the fact that the product must carry some serious weight. Likewise, the business model—the profit model, the revenue model, the accounting, and the business’s purpose—can’t be overwhelmed by blind growth. Falling in love with tactics, rapid profits, and growth at all costs often manifests weak products. In fact, in many cases, heavy-handed marketing hides flimsy products and often shows a scrambling business.

Now, the three take-charge men who battled for my attention each appeal and generally market to men who want to be better men. They want to be better at business, better at making money, better at relationships, have better sex lives, and use better self-discipline. Two claim to be polarizing one is polarizing without requiring boast.

I’ll note, ideologically and philosophically, I don’t subscribe to much of what these guys represent, but I think it’s fun to toss into the ring three men who publicly represent Alpha Masculinity, teach men how to reclaim or stoke their masculinity, and offer business lessons. But for the sake of this article, we’ll focus on their marketing. We’ll quickly see what separates the man from the boys. We’ll see who commands marketing skill and business acuity and who doesn’t.

Again, the three are Garrett White, Jason Capital, and Mike Cernovich.

Each recently emailed me to offer their exclusive events.

  • Mike Cernovich: The Trip of Lifetime
  • Jason Capital: The High-Status Summit Event
  • Garrett White: Be The Man Challenge

Watch the video: ΣΥΓΚΛΟΝΙΣΤΙΚΕΣ ΕΙΚΟΝΕΣ ΑΥΤΑ ΤΑ ΠΡΑΓΜΑΤΑ ΠΡΕΠΕΙ ΝΑ ΣΤΑΜΑΤΗΣΟΥΝ! marioTUBE


Comments:

  1. Grolkis

    An incomparable phrase;)

  2. Cliff

    It is a pity that I can not express myself now - is taken a lot. I will be back - I will absolutely express the opinion.

  3. Ferron

    This is what I was waiting for! Thank you very much!



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