au.haerentanimo.net
New recipes

Drinking Just One Bottle of Wine a Week Could Up Your Cancer Risk

Drinking Just One Bottle of Wine a Week Could Up Your Cancer Risk


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.


A new study found that one glass of vino per day had the same carcinogenic effect as smoking five cigarettes per week for men and 10 for women.

The latest study on the effects of wine on our health, published yesterday in BMC Public Health, found drinking just one bottle of wine each week (that’s less than a glass each day) could have the same carcinogenic impact as smoking five cigarettes for men and 10 for women within the same time period. This equates to an increased absolute lifetime risk of 1 percent in male nonsmokers and 1.3 percent in female nonsmokers.

Stay up to date on what healthy means now.

Sign up for our daily newsletter for more great articles and delicious, healthy recipes.

The researchers for this study analyzed information from the Cancer Research U.K. database on the general population’s lifetime risk of cancer, as well as how many of those could have been linked to tobacco and alcohol. Their findings showed that if 1,000 male nonsmokers and 1,000 female nonsmokers drank a bottle of wine per week, 10 extra men and 14 women could develop cancer during their lifetime.

The researchers also found drinking three bottles of wine per week—approximately three glasses per day—was equivalent to smoking about eight cigarettes per week for men and a whopping 23 cigarettes for women. This level of alcohol consumption is lower than what the CDC currently deems excessive, yet could increase men’s risk for cancer by almost two percent and women’s risk by almost five percent.

Considering reducing your alcohol intake or eliminating it altogether?

Approximately 70 percent of Americans don’t know alcohol is carcinogenic, even though the American Cancer Society has found clear links between alcohol consumption and seven types of cancer, as well as potential links to pancreatic and stomach cancer.

It’s important to note that the study’s authors wanted to clarify drinking alcohol in moderation is not equivalent to smoking in any way. Smoking kills up to half its users—about 6 million, plus another 890,000 from secondhand smoke each year, while 6.8 percent of men and 2.2 percent of women die from alcohol use each year.

However, if you currently drink more than recommended amount (that’s two drinks per day for men or one for women), it may be worth reducing your intake. And if you don’t currently drink, there’s certainly no need to start.


A bottle of wine a week as much of a cancer risk as 10 cigarettes

New research suggests that drinking just one bottle of wine* per week poses as much of a cancer risk** as smoking five to 10 cigarettes.

The study, carried out by a team of researchers from the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Bangor University and the University of Southampton, estimated that if 1,000 non-smoking men and 1,000 non-smoking women each drank one bottle of wine a week across their lifetime, roughly 10 men and 14 women would develop cancer.

The risk is particularly high for women, as drinking one bottle of wine a week increases the absolute lifetime risk of cancer to the same level posed by smoking 10 cigarettes. The research states that this is largely due to the chance of developing breast cancer, which is increased by drinking.

The risk level varies for men and women

For men, this is slightly lower, with one bottle of wine per week the equivalent of smoking just five cigarettes. The cancer risk here is to do with the chances of developing cancer in the bowel, liver, and oesophagus.

If that wasn't bad enough, the team also estimated that if 1,000 men and 1,000 women drank three bottles of wine a week, around 19 men and 36 women could develop cancer as a result.

Far from just a casual few glasses of wine with the gang, drinking three bottles of wine per week poses the same cancer risk as roughly eight cigarettes a week for men and 23 cigarettes a week for women.

The study will no doubt come as a shock to many people, as the link between drinking alcohol and cancer is not as clear in people's minds as that between smoking and cancer.

The research team made this point in the journal 'BMC Public Health', writing that the public generally does not view drinking as being as dangerous as smoking when it comes to cancer, although alcohol is directly linked to several different types of cancer.

This study concerns lifetime risk rather than drinking alcohol in moderation

Dr. Theresa Hydes, who was part of the research team, said: "It is well established that heavy drinking is linked to cancer of the mouth, throat, voice box, gullet, bowel, liver and breast.

"Yet, in contrast to smoking, this is not widely understood by the public. We hope that by using cigarettes as the comparator we could communicate this message more effectively to help individuals make more informed lifestyle choices."

She made it clear, however, that their study concerns "lifetime risk" of cancer, and does not make any connection between drinking alcohol in moderation and the chances of developing cancer.

She added: "At an individual level, cancer risk represented by drinking or smoking will vary and, for many individuals, the impact of 10 units of alcohol (one bottle of wine) or five to 10 cigarettes may be very different."

The story was discussed on RTÉ Radio 1's Drivetime which you can listen back to in the video at the top of the page.


You may gain weight.

Shutterstock/Sharomka

If you're looking to slim down, ditching that daily glass of wine might be a good place to start. A 2019 meta-analysis published in the British Journal of Nutrition found that "alcoholic beverage consumption significantly increased food energy intake," potentially leading to weight gain.

Considering that an average 5-oz glass of wine can contain upwards of 120 calories—and many people don't stop at just one—those drinks can be significant contributors to your weekly caloric intake if you're not careful.

For more healthy eating news, make sure to sign up for our newsletter!


Scientists claim weekly bottle of wine is equivalent to 10 cigarettes

Wine warning: new research claims one bottle of wine per week has an equivalent effect of smoking 10 cigarettes

The study, which is the first to compare the cancer risks of drinking and smoking in this way, estimated that if 1,000 non-smoking men and 1,000 non-smoking women each drank one bottle of wine per week across their lifetime, around 10 men and 14 women would develop cancer as a result.

This is due to the risk of cancer in parts of the body such as the bowel, liver and oesophagus.

Damning results

In addition, if 1,000 men and 1,000 women drank three bottles of wine per week throughout their lives, the report claims around 19 men and 36 women would develop cancer as a consequence.

According to the study published in the BMC Public Health journal, scientists from the University of Southampton, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust and Bangor University, set out to discover how many ‘cigarettes’ there are in a bottle of wine.

The damning results revealed that, for men, drinking a bottle of wine a week increases the risk of cancer because it is the equivalent of smoking five cigarettes.

And for women, drinking one bottle of wine a week is allegedly the equivalent to the same as smoking 10 cigarettes a week – mostly due to an increased risk of breast cancer caused by drinking.

Public awareness

Dr Theresa Hydes, who worked on the study, said that by choosing cigarettes as a comparison measure, she hopes it will help individuals make more informed lifestyle choices.

"It is well established that heavy drinking is linked to cancer of the mouth, throat, voice box, gullet, bowel, liver and breast,” explained Hydes.


Half a bottle of wine a week enough to put breast cancer survivors at risk

Drinking just one standard glass of wine a day may increase the risk of breast cancer returning for survivors of the common disease.

New research from Cancer Council Victoria shows that the equivalent of 60 ml of wine a day, or approximately half a bottle a week, could be enough to increase the risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Breast cancer survivors have been warned about their wine intake. Credit: ljubaphoto

With the overall five-year survival rate for breast cancer at 90 per cent, the research shows there's an important need to update the current public health advice on alcohol consumption to include those diagnosed with cancer.

No more than two standard drinks per day for healthy men and women is recommended to reduce the risk of alcohol associated harms.

"These results show that as little as six grams of alcohol per day - that's just three tablespoons of wine - is associated with a modest increase in risk for women who have had breast cancer, particularly those who are post-menopausal," said lead researcher Dr Anna Boltong of the University of Melbourne.

Lowering alcohol consumption and maintaining a healthy weight is already known to reduce the risk of breast cancer - a disease that affects one in eight women in Australia.

Dr Boltong will present the findings of the study at the Behavioural Research in Cancer Control Conference in Melbourne.


A lot of problem drinkers console themselves that ‘at least they don’t smoke’ etc. Society has woken up to the truth about tobacco products. Despite how much Big Tobacco tried to persuade people their cigarettes were safe.

However, we are not so clear about the alcohol cancer risk, or so it seems. New research may help to change that!

It has been revealed that partaking of a bottle of red or white wine a week raises the danger of cancerous cells developing by as much as smoking between 5 and 10 cigarettes, the analysis reveals.

For females, consuming just one bottle a week escalates the life-time threat by as much as smoking 10 cigarettes a week and for males, one bottle escalates the risk by as much as 5 cigarettes.

Alcohol can cause breast cancer

The greater danger for women is illustrated by the increased risk of breast cancer from alcohol consumption, according to analysts from the Academy Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Bangor College and the University of Southampton.

The staff approximated that if 1,000 non-smoking males and 1,000 non-smoking females each drank one bottle of red or white wine each week across their lifespan, about 10 men and 14 women would form malignant tumors consequently.

And if 1,000 men and 1,000 women consumed three bottles of wine every week across their lifespans, about 19 men and 36 women would develop tumors consequently.

Dr. Theresa Hydes, who managed the research, stated: “It is well developed that substantial alcohol consumption is connected to malignant tumors of the oral cavity, esophagus, voice box, gullet, digestive tract, liver organ, and breast.

The cancer risk is greater for women

“However, as opposed to cigarette smoking, this is not commonly recognized by the masses.
“We really hope that by making use of cigarettes as the comparator we can convey this information better to help people make more educated life decisions.”

She added: “We need to be completely clear that this report is not claiming that consuming alcohol in small amounts is in any way comparable to smoking cigarettes. Our finds connect to life-time hazard across the population.”

Jane Green, a lecturer of public health and co-director of the cancer epidemiology facility at the University of Oxford, stated: “It is essential to observe these results in context”.

Cancer risk increases with alcohol consumption

” For both males and females in the United Kingdom, the life long likelihood of carcinoma is about fifty percent.
” The publishers approximate that life-time risk is about 1% greater for males and females who consume a bottle of red or white wine a week, or who smoke 5 to 10 cigarettes a week, than for people who neither smoke cigarettes nor drink.”

Sophia Lowes, from Cancer Research United Kingdom, stated: “Analysis is certain – the less an individual consumes, the lesser the danger of tumors. Little adjustments such as having more alcohol-free days may make a huge improvement in just how much you consume.

“But tobacco smoking induces over 4 times as many instances of cancer in the United Kingdom compared to drinking. If you’re a cigarette smoker, the very best thing you can do for your health and wellness is stopping entirely, and you’re most likely to quit by making use of assistance from your local free stop-smoking support service.”

Big Alcohol is still trying to bury this news

A spokesperson from the Alcohol Information Alliance, which is financed by the alcoholic beverages sector, stated: “The conclusions drawn from this report are both unhelpful and baffling at a time when the general public is being pestered with inconsistent cautions of danger.

” There is a wide range of hereditary and standard of living variables that can result in a raised danger of carcinoma and the report on its own is crystal clear that alcohol consumption in moderation is not comparable to tobacco smoking.”

Alcohol cancer risk revealed

Highly irresponsible marketing

It’s shocking that the disgusting behavior of the big tobacco companies back in the seventies and eighties is being repeated today by the alcoholic drinks companies.

The makers of alcoholic beverages know that their products cause cancer and yet they spend vast sums of money in an attempt to bury any research that highlights this risk.

Here’s the hard truth – the alcoholic drinks industry is killing its customers and trying to hide the damage via lawsuits and heavily spun PR reports.

Ready to escape the loop?

If you are ready to call time on problem drinking – you are in the right place.

Why not click here and join us for a free quit drinking webinar today and find out how you can stop drinking quickly, easily and without any ineffective and miserable willpower required.


A bottle of wine a week as bad as smoking 10 cigarettes for women

A bottle of wine increases a woman’s cancer risk by as much as smoking 10 cigarettes a week, according to new research. For men, one bottle has the equivalent risk of smoking five cigarettes each week.

Study authors explained that women are more vulnerable due to an increased risk of breast cancer from drinking alcohol.

The research, conducted by the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Bangor University and University of Southampton and published in the journal BMC Public Health, found that in non-smoking men the increase in the absolute lifetime risk of cancer from drinking one bottle of wine per week was 1.0%.

For non-smoking women this was approximately 50% higher with an increase in absolute cancer risk of 1.4%

The team estimated that if 1,000 non-smoking men and 1,000 non-smoking women each drank one bottle of wine per week across their lifetime, around 10 men and 14 women would develop cancer as a result.

And if 1,000 men and 1,000 women drank three bottles of wine per week throughout their lives, around 19 men and 36 women would develop cancer as a result.

Commenting on the findings Dr Theresa Hydes, one of the study authors said: “It is well established that heavy drinking is linked to cancer of the mouth, throat, voice box, gullet, bowel, liver and breast.

“Yet, in contrast to smoking, this is not widely understood by the public.”

Dr Hydes believes that converting the risks of alcohol into “cigarette equivalents” could help people make more informed decisions about their drinking.

“We hope that by using cigarettes as the comparator we could communicate this message more effectively to help individuals make more informed lifestyle choices.”

Men and women are advised to drink no more than 14 units of alcohol a week, less than a bottle and a half of wine, after evidence concluded that regular drinking increased the risk of cancer.

But before we all head to the kitchen and empty our wine racks, researchers are keen to point out that the study is not saying that drinking alcohol in moderation is in any way equivalent to smoking.

“Our finds relate to lifetime risk across the population,” Dr Hydes adds.

“Smoking kills up to two thirds of its users , and cancer is just one of the many serious health consequences. This study purely addresses cancer risk in isolation.”

The authors also point out that the study does not take into account other smoking or alcohol-related outcomes such as respiratory, cardiovascular or liver disease in which case the conclusions would likely be quite different.

Jane Green, professor of epidemiology and co-director of the cancer epidemiology unit at the University of Oxford, told Sky: “It is important to view these results in context.

“For both men and women in the UK, the lifetime risk of cancer is around 50%.

“The authors estimate that lifetime risk is around 1% higher for men and women who drink a bottle of wine a week, or who smoke five to 10 cigarettes a week, than for those who neither smoke nor drink.”

Quaffing up to three glasses of wine or beer a week could lower the risk of dying from any cause, and in particular cancer, according to a study by researchers at Queens University, Belfast.

But scientists also warned that the risk of a deadly illness rises slightly among more regular drinkers.

The findings also found that with each additional drink per week, the risk of cancer and death from any cause increased.

Very heavy drinkers (three or more drinks each day) had the highest risk of dying early or developing cancer at 21 per cent.

This group were followed by heavy drinkers (two to three drinks each day), who were 10 per cent more likely to die young or get cancer.


These 4 diet and lifestyle changes can lower your cancer risk by almost 20%

The new American Cancer Society diet guidelines discourage red meat and alcohol.

  • Email icon
  • Facebook icon
  • Twitter icon
  • Linkedin icon
  • Flipboard icon
  • Print icon
  • Resize icon

Referenced Symbols

Bad news, booze and beef lovers.

The American Cancer Society has updated its diet and physical activity recommendations to help prevent cancer — and the new guidelines released on Tuesday discourage consuming red meat, processed food, sugar-sweetened drinks — and all alcohol.

The combination of these risk factors (as well as being physically inactive) accounted for at least 18.2% of cancer cases and 15.8% of cancer deaths in the U.S. in 2014, the American Cancer Society reported — making this unhealthy combo the biggest cancer risk factor after cigarette smoking in both men and women.

While the American Cancer Society has advised limiting the consumption of alcoholic drinks to no more to than one per day for women, and two for men since 2012, the new recommendations draw a harder line. “It is best not to drink alcohol,” it says. Period.

For people who still choose to imbibe, the revised guidance reiterates sticking to just one drink a day for women and two for men. And it should be noted that a standard single “drink” is defined as 12 ounces of regular beer, five ounces of wine, and a 1.5-ounce shot of distilled spirits or liquor, which may be smaller than what you actually pour yourself. For example, the University of Cambridge has noted that the average wine glass today holds 15 ounces — or three servings’ worth.

“That recommendation is the synthesis of the evidence and science that finds any amount of alcohol has been shown to increase cancer risk, including breast cancer,” Laura Makaroff, the senior vice president of Prevention & Early Detection at the American Cancer Society, told MarketWatch. “So the recommendation is to limit alcohol. It’s best not to drink, but if you choose to drink, do so in a moderate way.”

The American Cancer Society regularly revises its prevention recommendations, and the new updates are based on reviews of scientific research conducted by health organizations including: the International Agency on Cancer Research the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research and the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. They were published in “CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.”.

Recent research has warned that many people may need to lay off the sauce. In fact, a recent National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism report found that the number of Americans drinking themselves to death has more than doubled over the last two decades. Alcohol was a factor in nearly 1 million deaths between 1999 and 2017. And multiple studies have suggested a link between alcohol consumption and cancer, including a 2019 report published in the journal BMC Public Health that warned drinking one 750-milliliter bottle of wine a week is associated with the same lifetime cancer risk as smoking five cigarettes a week for men, and 10 cigarettes for women. The National Cancer Institute has also reported “clear patterns” between alcohol consumption and developing head and neck cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer and colorectal cancer.

The new American Cancer Society guidelines aren’t just tough on alcohol, however. While they previously encouraged a plant-based diet that limited processed meat, red meat and refined grain products, and recommended maintaining a healthy weight, the new suggestions are much more specific. They include limiting or removing all red and processed meats, sugar-sweetened beverages, high-processed foods and refined grain products from your diet.

“Especially with colorectal cancer, there is an increased risk with people who choose to consume a lot of red meat,” said Makaroff.

Indeed, the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) named processed meat a carcinogen in 2015, announcing it had found “sufficient evidence” that its consumption caused colorectal cancer. The IARC has also said that eating red meat is “probably carcinogenic to humans,” based on links to colorectal, pancreatic and prostate cancers.

Such diet and health concerns have helped fuel the growth of plant-based meat alternatives like those from Beyond Meat BYND, -4.14% and Impossible Foods, which have brought their meat-like vegetarian patties to fast-food joints like the Restaurant Brands International QSR, +0.46% chain Burger King. And sugar-sweetened beverages like sodas and sports drinks have been linked to early death, especially in women. Soft drink companies like Pepsi PEP, +0.01% and Coca-Cola KO, -0.25% have started producing more low-calorie drinks like seltzers and bottled waters to appeal to more health-conscious consumers.

The American Cancer Society recommends piling your plate with a variety of whole, unprocessed foods and vegetables, instead. It highlights dark green, red and orange veggies in particular, as well as fiber-rich legumes like beans and peas. The guide also promotes whole grains, whole fruits in a variety of colors, and overall foods that are “high in nutrients in amounts that help achieve and maintain a healthy body weight.”

“The emphasis here is really about following a healthy eating pattern,” said Makaroff. “When you fill your plate with all of the good things — vegetables, fiber-rich legumes, whole fruits and whole grains — then you’re going to have less room for red and processed meat, which keeps them limited and in moderation.”

Physical activity guidelines have been pumped up, as well. While the American Cancer Society previously recommended engaging in at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-activity each week, it now encourages adults to attempt doubling that. “Adults should engage in 150-300 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75-150 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity per week,” it reads, adding, “achieving or exceeding the upper limit of 300 minutes is optimal.”

Makaroff noted that reminders to stay active are vital during the coronavirus pandemic. “Many people generally lead a fairly sedentary lifestyle anyway, but then with COVID-19 and shelter-in-place orders, and all of these things we’ve recently gone through and are still going through, keeping an eye on our physical activity is maybe more important than ever, and making sure we are as active as we can be,” she said.

The American Cancer Society recommendations also recognize that access to whole, nutritious foods or safe places to exercise can be challenging for many people. Research suggests that racial inequality runs through education, health care, clean water and sanitation. “Your Zip Code matters a lot more than your genetic code,” said Makaroff. “The environments that we live, learn, work and play in are some of the biggest predictors of our overall health, which includes our risk of cancer.”

So the guidance also calls on public, private and community organizations to implement policy and environmental changes to: increase access to affordable, nutritious foods provide safe, enjoyable, and accessible opportunities for physical activity and limit alcohol for all individuals. “Those kinds of community actions are needed to be in place everywhere to help reduce systemic inequities,” said Makaroff.

Read the updated American Cancer Society guidelines in full here. And tips for adopting a healthier diet, squeezing in more exercise and losing weight can also be found in MarketWatch’s no B.S. guide to losing weight.

The American Cancer Society projects that 1.8 million people will be diagnosed with cancer in the U.S. this year. Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the CDC, killing around 600,000 people a year. The No. 1 killer is heart disease.

And after fighting for their lives, many cancer survivors wind up fighting for their livelihoods. As new chemotherapy treatment and supportive drug-based treatment often tops $10,000 a month, almost one in four of America’s roughly 17 million cancer survivors struggle to pay their medical bills after treatment.

What’s more, an estimated 20% to 30% of survivors do not go back to work three to 18 months after diagnosis, according to the American Journal of Managed Care. And just 57% of low-income women kept their jobs after cancer treatment, compared with 90% of middle-income and 95% of high-income women.


One bottle of wine 'increases cancer risk in women by same amount as ten cigarettes'

rinking just one bottle of wine per week increases the lifetime risk of cancer in women by the same amount as smoking ten cigarettes, according to new research.

The study, which is the first to compare the cancer risks of drinking and smoking in this way, estimated that if 1,000 non-smoking men and 1,000 non-smoking women each drank one bottle of wine per week across their lifetime, around 10 men and 14 women would develop cancer as a result.

For women, drinking one bottle of wine per week increases the absolute lifetime risk of cancer to the same extent as smoking 10 cigarettes a week, but for men the risk of cancer was equivalent to five cigarettes.

In women, alcohol intake was link to increased risk of breast cancer and in men, it was linked to cancers of the gastrointestinal tract and liver.

READ MORE

And if 1,000 men and 1,000 women drank three bottles of wine per week throughout their lives, around 19 men and 36 women could develop cancer as a result.

The gender gap widens as a result of the association between alcohol and breast cancer.

The team said three bottles a week is equivalent to smoking roughly eight cigarettes per week for men and 23 cigarettes per week for women.

Researchers from the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Bangor University and University of Southampton said alcohol is generally perceived by the public as being far less harmful than smoking, despite being directly linked to several different types of cancer.

Writing in the journal BMC Public Health, the researchers concluded: "One bottle of wine per week is associated with an increased absolute lifetime risk of alcohol-related cancers in women, driven by breast cancer, equivalent to the increased absolute cancer risk associated with 10 cigarettes per week."

The risks for men were equivalent to five cigarettes per week, they added.

Government guidelines on alcohol consumption advises drinking no more than 14 units of alcohol a week – a bottle and a half of wine.

Dr Theresa Hydes, who worked on the study, said: "It is well established that heavy drinking is linked to cancer of the mouth, throat, voice box, gullet, bowel, liver and breast.

"Yet, in contrast to smoking, this is not widely understood by the public. We hope that by using cigarettes as the comparator we could communicate this message more effectively to help individuals make more informed lifestyle choices."

"We must be absolutely clear that this study is not saying that drinking alcohol in moderation is in any way equivalent to smoking. Our finds relate to lifetime risk across the population.

"At an individual level, cancer risk represented by drinking or smoking will vary and, for many individuals, the impact of 10 units of alcohol (one bottle of wine) or five to 10 cigarettes may be very different."

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore, chairman of the Alcohol Health Alliance, said: "Even at relatively low levels, alcohol can have serious consequences for our health.

"The Chief Medical Officers recommend drinking no more than 14 units a week to keep the risks low but, worryingly, few people are aware of the guidelines."

Have your say. Get involved in exciting, inspiring conversations. Get involved in exciting, inspiring conversations with other readers. VIEW COMMENTS


Additional files

Table S1. References for the percentage relative risk of drinking ten units of alcohol per week. Table S2. Calculation of lifetime risk of cancer in alcohol abstaining never smokers. Table S3. Frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption in the UK, Health Survey for England data combined years 2011� (Public Health England n.d.). Table S4. Calculation of absolute increase lifetime risk of cancer due to ten and 30 units of alcohol or ten and 30 cigarettes per week in non-smokers and non-drinkers respectively. Table S5. References and calculation of absolute increase lifetime risk of cancer due to ten and 30 cigarettes per week. Table S6. Calculation of absolute increase lifetime risk of cancer due to ten units of alcohol or ten cigarettes per week in non-smokers and non-drinkers respectively following a sensitivity analysis. Table S7. Incidence and mortality data for alcohol-related cancers (CRUK data). (DOCX 76 kb)

Contains a worked example of logarithmic transformation used to calculate RR of smoking 10 cigarettes per week. (DOCX 31 kb)


Watch the video: Πώς έβγαλα την ποδηλασία μου


Comments:

  1. Hanan

    Has cheaply got, it was easily lost.

  2. Jarrad

    It is remarkable, this very valuable opinion

  3. Royden

    I mean, you allow the mistake. Enter we'll discuss. Write to me in PM, we'll talk.

  4. Aldred

    A very good thing

  5. Zahur

    Good morning everyone! That smiled at me !!!!



Write a message