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Outrageously Fattening Foods Around the World (Slideshow)

Outrageously Fattening Foods Around the World (Slideshow)


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iStock/ Thinkstock

This popular Brazilian dish is made from peeled black-eyed peas that are mushed-up into a ball and deep-fried… in palm oil! The balls are then cut in half and stuffed with shrimp, sauce, and trimmings. For the record, palm oil is one of the healthier oils going because it’s trans fat-free, but it is high in calories, making it a great oil to supplement a staple food diet, but not so good if you’re watching your waistline.

Acarajé, Brazil

iStock/ Thinkstock

This popular Brazilian dish is made from peeled black-eyed peas that are mushed-up into a ball and deep-fried… in palm oil! The balls are then cut in half and stuffed with shrimp, sauce, and trimmings. For the record, palm oil is one of the healthier oils going because it’s trans fat-free, but it is high in calories, making it a great oil to supplement a staple food diet, but not so good if you’re watching your waistline.

Churros, Spain

iStock/ Thinkstock

A churro is a long Spanish doughnut (also popular in France, the Philippines, Portugal, and Latin America). Legend has it that Portuguese traders brought something similar to the churros back to Europe from their travels through the Orient, but this Spanish version has since evolved. It’s deep-fried, dusted with cinnamon and sugar, and eaten either by itself or dipped in a bowl of thick chocolate.

Poutine, Canada

iStock/ Thinkstock

Originally from Quebec, this delicious Canadian favorite is often (affectionately) referred to as a heart-attack in a bowl and is made with french fries before being topped off with cheese curds and a thick brown-gravy sauce. It’s salty, cheesy, and so outrageously fattening!

Khachapuri, Georgia

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This traditional dish is basically bread filled with melted cheese. The leavened bread is left to rise then shaped in all manner of ways, a favorite is to form it into a type of boat shape (called acharuli). The center is then filled with cheese (a lot of cheese), a raw egg or two, and other tasty ingredients. Other versions include achma, which has multiple layers of cheese and other ingredients, and ossuri which includes potato as well as cheese with the filling.

Aligot, France

This delicious French countryside-kitchen favorite is a mixture of melted cheese and potato. Buttery potatoes are boiled and mashed-up with a bit of garlic, then blended with cheese that melts into the concoction. Traditionally, Tomme de Laguiole is used (or Tomme d’Auvergne), but mozzarella can also be substituted in. The whole thing is often used as a fondue-type snack with pork sausage used to scoop up big, gooey chunks.

Deep-Fried Mars Bars, U.K.

This treat originated in a “chip shop” in Scotland when a Mars Bar (a popular British chocolate bar with nougat, caramel, almonds, and covered in soft milk chocolate) was dipped in the same kind of beer batter that fish are usually coated in and deep-fried… the result was so salty-sweet delicious that it became an instant success. For the best results, chill the Mars Bar first to prevent it from melting into the oil instantly. The spirit of the deep-fried Mars Bar has even been imported to the U.S. with various incarnations of deep-fried Oreos in bars across the country.

Jalebi, India

iStock/ Thinkstock

This is a popular dessert treat in India and across many Middle Eastern countries that is basically gelatinized sugar. It’s made with a wheat flour batter that’s deep-fried into circular shapes and then soaked in sugar syrups. The orange sweet is eaten hot or cold and is chewy, syrupy, and really, really sweet.

Nutella Crêpes, France

This dish may be eaten around the world now, but the crêpe is a French specialty for good reason. French crêpes are thin and fluffy but also buttery and dusted with sugar. They’re so delicious you may be so inclined to eat several in one sitting, making them a terrible weight-loss food. They’re also filled with many delicious additions from savory to sweet, one example being dollops of thick Nutella spread.


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)


Best Fermented Foods from Around the World

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]Fermented foods have become popular again in recent years, largely due to health conscious individuals.

While Kimchi and Kombucha may have developed a new following in the west, fermented foods have been an integral part of communities across the globe.

Archeological evidence points out to fermentation being one of the oldest methods of food preservation. Its history dates back to the beginning of agriculture. From China and Fertile Crescent to Africa and Americas, vegetables, meat, fish, dairy, grains and fruits have been fermented into food and beverages.

Fermented processes were likely developed by women through trial and error. Food was not just preserved for winter, droughts or migration, but because these were considered as healing medicine beneficial to the body.

Fermented foods play an important role in gut health and growth of good bacteria. A study in Tanzania showed that gruel made with fermented grains reduced incidence of diarrhoea in children by 33%.

When you ferment grains and certain tubers, you reduce anti-nutrient compounds and increase absorption of vitamins. Active bacteria, yeast and mound cultures turn these foods into rich sources of Vitamin K, A, B12, thiamine, niacin, and protein-building acids like lysine and methionine.

Every region has at least one unique dish as a part of its cultural heritage. This food guide brings you unfamiliar foods other than yoghurts, sauces, pickles and cottage cheese.

(And if you want to learn how to make some of these foods yourself, check out The Art of Fermented Foods, the online course with the Chef Mirna Bamieh)



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