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In Season: Champagne

In Season: Champagne


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The complete guide to choosing, storing, opening―even cooking with―the bubbly stuff.

All About: Champagne was first created by a 17th century monk by the name of Dom Perignon. Upon tasting it for the first time, he reportedly exclaimed, "Oh, come quickly, I am drinking stars!" To keep his invention from exploding (he was only mildly successful in this endeavor), Perignon used wine bottles that were thicker than the norm, and tied the corks down with string.

What it is: This heady beverage is actually a sparkling blend of red and white wines. True champagne comes only from the Champagne region of northeast France, where the usual grape combination is Chardonnay with either pinot noir or pinot blanc. Champagne-lookalikes from Italy are called spumante, while German versions are called Sekt, and those from such places as the U.S. are simply called sparkling wines.

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What it looks like: These bubbly concoctions range in color from the palest gold to a rich apricot blush.
What it tastes like: Champagnes range in flavor from yeasty to toasty, and from dry to sweet. The label will tell you the level of sweetness.

Here's a quick guide to make your selection easier:

  • Brut: extremely dry (less than 1.5% sugar)
  • Extra sec or extra dry: dry (1.2-2.0% sugar)
  • Sec: slightly sweet (1.7-3.5% sugar)
  • Demi-sec: sweet (3.3-5.0% sugar); dessert wine
  • Doux: very sweet (over 5.0% sugar); dessert wine

Why it's so expensive: The best champagnes not only come from premium grapes, but they're also made by a complex traditional method called methode champenoise, in which the wine undergoes a second fermentation in the bottle.

Storage tips: This New Year's favorite should never be stored more than a couple of hours in the refrigerator, as excess chill will dull both the flavor and the bouquet. (This goes for other white wines as well.) Instead, store it in a cool, dry place.

Serving tips: Champagne (and other sparkling wines) should be served chilled, so refrigerate it two hours before serving. If necessary, you can speed-chill it in about 20 minutes by completely submerging the bottle in a bucket filled with a 50/50 split of ice and water.

To open the bottle, do the following:

  1. Remove the foil.
  2. Untwist the wire cage around the cork.
  3. Hold the bottle at a 45-degree angle, pointed away from any other people in the room.
  4. Keeping your fingers over the cork, gently rotate the bottle (but not the cork) with your other hand.
  5. When you feel the cork begin to loosen and move up, ease it gently from the bottle with your thumb. When properly done, you'll hear a soft "poof," not a loud "pop."Champagne should always be served in slender flutes, which allow far fewer bubbles to escape than wide-mouth glasses do. Make sure the flutes are free of soap film and dust, both of which can destroy the bubbles.

Saving tips: The best way to maintain the effervescence of leftover champagne is to use an inexpensive metal champagne stopper (available in wine stores and gourmet specialty shops). In lieu of that, drop a stainless-steel needle or pin into the bottle, then fasten a balloon over the top with a rubber band. Either method will keep the beverage bubbly for about two days.

Did you know: Has your champagne lost its sparkle? Revive it by dropping a raisin into the bottle.

Nutritional info: One 3.5 ounce glass of the bubbly will cost you about 70 calories. You'll also be imbibing 1.0 gram of protein and 5.0 milligrams of sodium―but no fiber, fat, or cholesterol.


Don't toss out that leftover Champagne — use up your bubbly in these 7 easy dishes instead

After New Year's Eve, most people toss out their half-finished Champagne and sparkling wine bottles, but chefs say that could be a waste.

"I'm like, 'Why would you throw it out?' Just save it and use it just like you would deglaze a pan or you would make a reduction and whisk butter in," chef Adrienne Cheatham, founder of the pop-up dinner series SundayBest, told Insider.

"Now that it's just flat wine, it may not be good for drinking. It may not give you the same flavor that you're looking for in a good drinking wine, but in cooking, it still has so much value," she said.

Insider spoke with Cheatham and other chefs to learn seven delicious ways to add bubbly into breakfast, dinner, and dessert dishes using the Champagne and sparkling wine you may have sitting in your fridge after New Year's Eve or other celebrations.


20 Champagne Cocktails for Your Next Celebration

Looking to up your drink game? Pop the cork and get the evening started with these delightfully refreshing recipes.

We love the elegant simplicity of champagne on its own, but there's something extra special about taking things to the next level, jazzing up your bubbly with a few thoughtful ingredients&mdashand nothing gives a cocktail an extra bit of flare like a glug of sparkling wine. The next time you find yourself looking for a way to make your favorite sparklers a touch more festive, consider these champagne cocktails to get your guests buzzing.

Ingredients
1.5 oz Empress 1908
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
.5 oz simple syrup
Sparkling wine

Instructions

Shake all ingredients except for sparkling wine on ice, double strain into a chilled flute, and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a lemon twist.

Ingredients
1.5 oz Mount Gay Black Barrel rum
.75 oz honey ryrup
3 sage leaves
2 oz dry sparkling wine

Instructions

Add rum, lime, syrup and sage to a shaker. Add ice and shake. Fine strain into champagne glass and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with lemon and sage.

Ingredients
1 bottle champagne
1 cup apple cider
2 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp ground cinnamon

Instructions

On a small plate, combine sugar and cinnamon. Dip champagne flutes in water to wet the rims, then dip in cinnamon sugar mixture. Fill champagne flutes 1/4 full with apple cider, then top off with champagne.

Ingredients
1.5 oz Malibu Original
.5 oz pineapple juice
.5 oz coconut cream
3 oz sparking wine

Instructions

Pour all ingredients (except sparkling wine) into an ice-filled shaker. Shake until cold, pour sparkling wine into shaker and stir. Strain into a chilled glass and top with a slice of pineapple.

Ingredients
1 oz Nonino Amaro
.5 oz simple syrup
.5 oz lemon juice
3 slices of strawberry
Montand Brut Champagne

Instructions

Muddle 2 slices of strawberry, simple syrup, and lemon juice in shaker. Add Nonino and ice and shake until fully chilled. Double strain into champagne glass and top with bubbles. Drop one strawberry slice into flute.

From Austin Doiron at NEAT Bottle Shop & Tasting Room

Ingredients
1.5 oz Don Q Anejo tequila
.5 oz Galliano Yellow
.5 oz St.Germain
1 oz lemon juice
.75 oz simple syrup
.75 oz egg white
5 drops orange blossom water
Prosecco
Dried blood orange wheel

Instructions

Dry shake all ingredients. Add ice and shake again. Pour into a brandy snifter, top w/ prosecco and 5 drops orange blossom water. Garnish with a dried blood orange wheel.

Ingredients
1.5 oz Grand Marnier Cordon Rouge
.75 oz fresh lemon juice
1 bar spoon simple syrup
top with dry champagne

Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a champagne flute. Garnish with orange zest.

Ingredients
1.5 oz Courvoisier VSOP
1 oz Dolin Dry Vermouth
.75 oz Campari
Top with Champagne

Instructions

Combine all ingredients except champagne with ice and stir to combine. Top with champagne.

Ingredients
3 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
1 cup ginger-flavored kombucha
2 cups prosecco or sparkling wine
24 raspberries

Instructions

In a large pitcher, combine orange juice and kombucha. Top with prosecco stir to combine. Put 3 raspberries at bottom of each champagne flute. Pour in kombucha mixture. Serves 8.

Ingredients
1 oz Absolut Elyx vodka
.75 oz lemon juice
.5 oz Crème de Menthe
1 oz prosecco
.5 oz raspberry syrup

Instructions

Combine Elyx, lemon juice, Creme de Menthe, and prosecco into a julep cup. Add crushed ice till about 3/4 full. Stir to dilute and chill. Add more crushed ice to create a mound, then drizzle raspberry syrup over the top. Garnish with a mint sprig and a raspberry.

From Bar Margot at the Four Seasons Hotel, Atlanta

Ingredients
3 oz Jardesca Red Aperitiva
2 oz Champagne or Sparkling Wine
1 Orange Twist

Instructions

Combine all ingredients in a champagne flute.

Ingredients
5 pomegranate seeds
1 oz pomegranate liqueur
4 oz chilled champagne

Instructions

Add pomegranate seed to glass. Add liqueur and pour in champagne.

Ingredients
4 mangoes, very ripe and diced
1 mango, cut into 1/2-inch cubes, for garnish
1 bottle champagne

Instructions

In a food processor or blender, puree diced mangoes. Using a fine-mesh sieve, strain puree, discarding any solids. (You should have approximately 1 1/2 cups puree.) In a large pitcher, mix together pureed mango and champagne.

Ingredients
1 tablespoon vodka
.25 oz apricot nectar
.5 cup champagne

Instructions

Pour the vodka and nectar into a flute. Top with champagne.

Ingredients
1 sugar cube
Angostura bitters
4 oz chilled champagne
Lemon zest

Instructions

Soak sugar cube by placing it on top of the bitters bottle. Holding sugar cube in place with your finger, turn bottle upside down. The bitters will drip onto the cube, soaking it in seconds. Drop soaked cube into a champagne flute. Pour in champagne. Add strip of lemon zest.

Ingredients
2 containers raspberries
8 oz rhubarb
.5 cup sugar
.5 cup water
Chilled prosecco

Instructions

In a blender or food processor, purée raspberries, rhubarb, sugar, and water until smooth. With rubber spatula, push mixture through fine-mesh sieve set over medium bowl, if desired. To serve, pour 1 to 2 tablespoons of puree into champagne flute and top with prosecco.

Ingredients
2 oz blood orange juice
2 oz Campari
.5 oz rosemary demerara simple syrup*
Sparkling wine

*Rosemary Demerara Simple Syrup: Pour the .5 gallon water and 1 gallon demerara sugar into a saucepan. Heat the ingredients until dissolved. Stir until the liquid becomes completely clear, then remove from heat source. Add 5 rosemary sprigs into the simple syrup for flavor right as it comes off the burner. Let sit until cool. Remove rosemary sprigs from simple syrup and store for up to 3 weeks.

Instructions

Mix the blood orange juice, Campari, and rosemary demerara simple syrup into a pot. Heat, bringing to a boil for 5 minutes while stirring constantly. Cool and refrigerate. When ready to serve, pour into champagne flutes and top with sparkling wine.


12 Sparkling Wine Cocktails for the Holidays

Sparkling wine is synonymous with celebration (and especially with New Year’s Eve), so it’s no surprise that sparkling cocktails can pull your holiday event together with a simple pour, stir, and twist. Whether you’re hosting a spirited brunch or an evening affair, feel free to play around with different types of sparkling wine, but keep your grand cru Champagnes in the chiller. This is a time to showcase your inexpensive bottles.

Cristal D'Arques Lady Diamond Glass Goblets, 6 for $54.99 at Target

These gorgeous goblets are a nice alternative to familiar flutes, and they're made from Diamax material that's dishwasher-safe.

Pro-Tip: Be sure you know how to open a bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine so that it doesn’t fall flat (or worse, injure someone)!

French 75

The French 75 is a classic Champagne cocktail: traditional, elegant, and best suited for a cocktail party. Get our French 75 recipe.

Champagne Sunrise

Try this easy, fizzily festive twist on the tried-and-true tequila sunrise to welcome in 2019. You’ll need:

  • 1 ounce grenadine
  • 3 ounces orange juice
  • 1 1/2 ounces tequila
  • sparkling wine
  • ice

To make it, fill a highball glass with ice, then pour in the grenadine. Next, pour in the orange juice, then the tequila, and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a fresh orange wedge if you like.

Persimmon Champagne Cocktail

Sweet persimmons make this a lovely, complex little cocktail that’s super simple to make. Just be sure your Hachiya persimmons are really soft and ripe. Get the Persimmon Champagne Cocktail recipe.

Cherry Sugar Fizz

The bobbing cherries make this sweet cocktail feel extra playful. It would definitely be a crowd-pleaser at a party, but there’s no reason you couldn’t make some with a few friends for an evening in. Get our Cherry Sugar Fizz recipe.

Sparkling Rosemary Pomegranate Mimosas

Pomegranates are one of the best reasons to look forward to winter. The floral and herbaceous notes in this drink are wonderful on a chilly winter’s eve, and it’s a cinch to create. Get the Sparkling Rosemary Pomegranate Mimosas recipe.

Yellow Bicycle

Be careful! Even though this drink feels light, it’s a potent blend. It addition to Prosecco, it contains both elderflower liqueur and yellow Chartreuse, and it’s sure to liven up any party. Get our Yellow Bicycle Cocktail recipe.

Prosecco Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato)

The Italian word sbagliato translates to “mistaken.” Legend has it this drink was invented when a bartender accidentally grabbed a bottle of Spumante, instead of gin, while mixing a Negroni. It was a happy accident, and these cheery drinks are perfect before a meal. Get our Prosecco Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato) recipe.

Pear & Thyme Fizz

The thyme gives this bubbly concoction a savory kick. This is an easy yet impressive cocktail that you can mix up for guests in a matter of minutes. Get the Pear & Thyme Fizz recipe.

Hibiscus & Ginger Champagne Cocktail

The dried hibiscus flower makes these cocktails as beautiful as they are delicious—they could double as decoration at a holiday party. Get the Hibiscus & Ginger Champagne Cocktail recipe.

Holiday Sparkler

Brown sugar and baking spices make this a warming winter cocktail brandy doesn’t hurt, either. It’s a perfect pick-me-up for when the next snowstorm hits. Add a little edible gold or silver glitter to the sugar rim for extra festive sparkle. Get our Holiday Sparkler Cocktail recipe.

Poinsettia Punch

Cranberry and orange are a natural combination. This beauty is easy to make in large batches, it’s citrusy, and it reeks of holiday cheer. Get our Poinsettia Punch recipe.

Champagne and Sorbet Float

Winter got you down? Indulge in a little escapism with this fanciful sorbet-and-lavender cocktail. Get our Champagne and Sorbet Float recipe.

No time to make a run for extra bubbly? See if Saucey delivers in your area—if so, they’ll bring wine, beer, spirits, and more right to your door. Select areas can also get free 30 minute delivery (with no order minimum requirement).

Related Video: How to Open a Champagne Bottle

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.


5 Favorite Sparkling Wine–Pairing Recipes

In a perfect world, we’d all have sparkling wine every day, right? Five o’clock comes and with it a POP. Failing that, we can at least mark special occasions—like Fridays, for example—with bubbles.

Many celebratory occasions have traditional foods tied to them, and Valentine’s Day is no exception. You’ve got to have chocolate. But what to eat before the chocolate? My feeling is that lighter foods are good so that you save room for dessert and stay limber. And not only is sparkling wine a great food accompaniment, it’s also so buoyant and happy-making and convivial that it suits the day. Below are five dishes—canapés, starters and small plates—paired with various bubbly styles to keep your Valentine’s evening light so you can concentrate on the main event. No, no, I mean the chocolate.

Crispy Mushrooms and Quail Egg on Rye Bread

Serving Champagne and canapés together is a classic move to start a special meal. A few years back, New York Scandinavian restaurant Aquavit created an all-canapé menu for us to show off the range of styles in these sparkling wines and their respective, and somewhat elevated, food matches.

Chef Emma Bengtsson, whose calm, controlled demeanor stands out in the stressful environment of pro kitchens, gave us recipes with great twists that nudged our expectations for the wine: scallops with white soy, strawberry, trout roe and apple granita, along with duck with pickled cauliflower. But this one could not be more direct. It comes from foraging season in western Sweden where she grew up, so has a strong pull for her. Mushrooms are sautéed until crisp (don’t stir them too much or they won’t crisp up), then put on rye toasts and topped with halved quail eggs and parsley. That’s it. The dish brings together woodsy mushrooms, light spice in the bread, a bright herb and a rich egg. It’s perfect with the creamy Marc Hebrart Brut Selection NV, which is a little earthy from its hefty percentage of Pinot Noir. Try the recipe, or all three for a private mini-tasting party.

Clam Chowder and Warmed Radishes with Crunchy Sea Salt

Boston-based Legal Sea Foods has impressed me since my wife and I first went when our now 18-year-old son was about nine months old. People pooh-pooh it because it’s a chain (today numbering 30-odd locations), but to my eyes they use their buying power to ensure tip-top quality at a good price, and they’ve invested in and promoted wine for decades.

So I was very excited to put together a menu story with them a few years ago, and to go up the coast from Boston to oversee the photo shoot. The location was the beautiful waterfront home of president and CEO Roger Berkowitz and his wife, Lynne, on a spit of land called Nahant. Berkowitz’s grandfather had opened a grocery store called Legal Cash Market in 1904, and his father opened the fish store in 1950. It’s where Julia Child shopped, including for the famously ugly monkfish she also gave advice on the wine list in the early days. A restaurant followed, and Roger took it over and grew it considerably after business school. (In December, Berkowitz announced that he had sold the restaurant side of the business but was retaining retail and online sales.)

The menu, by chef Rich Vellante, was straightforward, but with great touches like the fatback in this recipe. The clam chowder is simply classic the radishes can awaken the appetite before the soup or brighten the palate after the creamy indulgence. Either way, pour Champagne. Vice president of beverage operations Sandy Block chose an excellent non-vintage brut with broad appeal, the Taittinger La Française, to pair with this satisfying soup.

Scallop Crudo with Caviar, Jalapeño and Apple Marinated in Passion-Fruit Juice

You know the old saying that a restaurant had a wine list the size of a phone book? Well New York’s Cru, now closed, had a wine list the size of two phone books and the excellence of its cellar earned it a Wine Spectator Grand Award. When putting together matches for a Chardonnay menu for us, wine director Robert Bohr and sommelier Michel Couvreux pulled from some 4,500 selections.

The first wine up was a Billecart-Salmon Blanc de Blancs 1996 with a luxuriant texture. Chef Shea Gallante served marinated, dressed raw scallops. The accompaniments may sound surprising, but preparation is fast and easy (just make sure you have yuzu, mustard oil and shiso leaves on hand) and the flavors really ping around. As Gallante pointed out in the story, people want rich food with Champagne, but that doesn’t have to mean fat raw scallops do very nicely.

Although the restaurant closed, the story has a happy ending, illustrating how the hospitality business has its own sort of family tree: Bohr and chef Ryan Hardy founded Delicious Hospitality Group, which has three great restaurants in New York. Couvreux is beverage director for Thomas Keller’s New York restaurants, including Grand Award-winning Per Se. And Gallante is now chef at Lincoln Ristorante, a Best of Award of Excellence winner. Although you might not be able to dine at these spots right now, the former team's scallops and Champagne match will certainly stimulate your desire.

Mini Spinach Quiches

More than a decade ago, my friend and co-worker Jennifer Fiedler started a series called 8 & $20, with a recipe with no more than eight ingredients (plus pantry staples) and wines to match costing under $20. It had a fresh appeal and was informed by her serious cooking skills and fun writing. Fiedler returned to Hawaii, where she grew up, and is raising two adorable kids there while also writing and baking. The column continues.

Like omelettes and risotto, quiche is a really good thing to master, and not difficult at all. It can be baked ahead of time, and you can offer it as a whole for a meal or brunch or as mini quiches for a party. (This version of the recipe serves 8 to 10 as appetizers, so if you’re actually having a romantic dinner for two instead of feeding your family unit while stuck at home, any leftovers will keep a few days in the fridge.) Just as you can adapt quiche to the ingredients you have on hand, you can also adapt the wines. Fiedler recommended a fruity bubbly like Prosecco or California sparkling, which makes sense to play against the earthy spinach. And bubbles are always good with eggs.

Lemon Olive Oil Cake with Tequlia Glaze

When he was 17, Victor Flores took a big leap. He moved to New York from Mexico by himself, with no family waiting for his arrival here. As he recalls, “I knew somebody who knew somebody.” He had a place to stay for a bit, and plans to work in construction. But the harsh winter of 1989 put a damper on that plan. Flores found a job washing dishes at Orso, an Italian restaurant in the Joe Allen family of Theater District mainstays run by Allen’s daughter, Julie Lumia, whom he considers his mentor. (Allen just passed away on Feb. 7.) By 2000, Flores was running the kitchens at Orso and Joe Allen, and an outpost in Maine that has since closed. He also runs Bar Centrale, a secret spot so pleasant that I hesitate to mention it.

In an age of niche chefs (ya gotta have a gimmick), Flores is a breath of fresh air. He cooks confidently in a number of idioms for varied crowds. No preparation is beneath him, and yet he brings something to standard dishes and innovations. He’s direct and economical with language, and he has as sweet a disposition and is as accessible as any chef I’ve ever written about. (I recently texted him to ask if he puts garlic in guacamole. He responded “No.” Then about five minutes later, he sent a flurry of acceptable additions followed by a reminder: “no garlic.”)

Flores did a holiday menu for Wine Spectator that crossed Asian and Mexican flavors with tuna and gently spiced up a massive prime rib roast. For dessert, he topped a super-moist olive oil cake with a tequila glaze. It’s a subtle touch you might not even identify the tequila if you didn’t know it was there, but it cuts the sweetness and lifts the oil flavor. Lightly sweet bubbles, in this case a Moscato d’Asti chosen by Flores, fit the bill for this recipe match.


If there was one vegetable that could show you it’s springtime without telling you it’s springtime, it’s the humble asparagus. This recipe is just as delicious as it looks—there’s a reason why it made the cover of Athena’s book, Cook Beautiful—and it’s also incredibly easy to make. Win-win!

This has been one of the most popular recipes on EyeSwoon and for good reason. The cod melts in your mouth with the sweet tang of citrus and Aleppo pepper spice. This is a transitional dish that can take you from vibrant Winter citrus to Spring-forward fennel.


12 Sparkling Wine Cocktails for the Holidays

Sparkling wine is synonymous with celebration (and especially with New Year’s Eve), so it’s no surprise that sparkling cocktails can pull your holiday event together with a simple pour, stir, and twist. Whether you’re hosting a spirited brunch or an evening affair, feel free to play around with different types of sparkling wine, but keep your grand cru Champagnes in the chiller. This is a time to showcase your inexpensive bottles.

Cristal D'Arques Lady Diamond Glass Goblets, 6 for $54.99 at Target

These gorgeous goblets are a nice alternative to familiar flutes, and they're made from Diamax material that's dishwasher-safe.

Pro-Tip: Be sure you know how to open a bottle of Champagne or sparkling wine so that it doesn’t fall flat (or worse, injure someone)!

French 75

The French 75 is a classic Champagne cocktail: traditional, elegant, and best suited for a cocktail party. Get our French 75 recipe.

Champagne Sunrise

Try this easy, fizzily festive twist on the tried-and-true tequila sunrise to welcome in 2019. You’ll need:

  • 1 ounce grenadine
  • 3 ounces orange juice
  • 1 1/2 ounces tequila
  • sparkling wine
  • ice

To make it, fill a highball glass with ice, then pour in the grenadine. Next, pour in the orange juice, then the tequila, and top with sparkling wine. Garnish with a fresh orange wedge if you like.

Persimmon Champagne Cocktail

Sweet persimmons make this a lovely, complex little cocktail that’s super simple to make. Just be sure your Hachiya persimmons are really soft and ripe. Get the Persimmon Champagne Cocktail recipe.

Cherry Sugar Fizz

The bobbing cherries make this sweet cocktail feel extra playful. It would definitely be a crowd-pleaser at a party, but there’s no reason you couldn’t make some with a few friends for an evening in. Get our Cherry Sugar Fizz recipe.

Sparkling Rosemary Pomegranate Mimosas

Pomegranates are one of the best reasons to look forward to winter. The floral and herbaceous notes in this drink are wonderful on a chilly winter’s eve, and it’s a cinch to create. Get the Sparkling Rosemary Pomegranate Mimosas recipe.

Yellow Bicycle

Be careful! Even though this drink feels light, it’s a potent blend. It addition to Prosecco, it contains both elderflower liqueur and yellow Chartreuse, and it’s sure to liven up any party. Get our Yellow Bicycle Cocktail recipe.

Prosecco Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato)

The Italian word sbagliato translates to “mistaken.” Legend has it this drink was invented when a bartender accidentally grabbed a bottle of Spumante, instead of gin, while mixing a Negroni. It was a happy accident, and these cheery drinks are perfect before a meal. Get our Prosecco Negroni (Negroni Sbagliato) recipe.

Pear & Thyme Fizz

The thyme gives this bubbly concoction a savory kick. This is an easy yet impressive cocktail that you can mix up for guests in a matter of minutes. Get the Pear & Thyme Fizz recipe.

Hibiscus & Ginger Champagne Cocktail

The dried hibiscus flower makes these cocktails as beautiful as they are delicious—they could double as decoration at a holiday party. Get the Hibiscus & Ginger Champagne Cocktail recipe.

Holiday Sparkler

Brown sugar and baking spices make this a warming winter cocktail brandy doesn’t hurt, either. It’s a perfect pick-me-up for when the next snowstorm hits. Add a little edible gold or silver glitter to the sugar rim for extra festive sparkle. Get our Holiday Sparkler Cocktail recipe.

Poinsettia Punch

Cranberry and orange are a natural combination. This beauty is easy to make in large batches, it’s citrusy, and it reeks of holiday cheer. Get our Poinsettia Punch recipe.

Champagne and Sorbet Float

Winter got you down? Indulge in a little escapism with this fanciful sorbet-and-lavender cocktail. Get our Champagne and Sorbet Float recipe.

No time to make a run for extra bubbly? See if Saucey delivers in your area—if so, they’ll bring wine, beer, spirits, and more right to your door. Select areas can also get free 30 minute delivery (with no order minimum requirement).

Related Video: How to Open a Champagne Bottle

All featured products are curated independently by our editors. When you buy something through our retail links, we may receive a commission. For more great hand-picked products, check out the Chowhound Shop.


Go for the Gold with White Russian Cake Pops

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A.V. is a DIY expert and creator of Avdoeswhat.com. What began as a traditional Do-It-Yourself blog has grown into a lifestyle platform that includes crafts, upcycled furniture and pop culture. As a digital host for HGTV Handmade, along with appearances in Bustle, The Pioneer Woman, and BuzzFeed, A.V. is determined to help thrifty millennials realize "Life is better when you Do-It-Yourself!" A.V. is also the co-creator of University of Dope, an exciting thought-provoking card game that celebrates Hip Hop culture.The first of its kind.

David Mesfin, Creative Director + Brand Expert

David is a multi-disciplinary designer and creative director with award-winning integrated campaign background, including the Super Bowl, FIFA, NFL, and global launch campaign. He has created global partnerships to increase brand awareness through traditional, digital, social, and experimental marketing campaigns, collaborating with C-suite leaders from Genesis, Hyundai, Honda, Sony, Adidas, Oakley, Toyota, Neutrogena, Land more to communicate their company's vision through creative and marketing. He has earned awards from Cannes, One Show, Clio, Webby, EFFIE, Communication Arts, Google Creative Sandbox, OC and LA ADDY, DIGIDAY, TED | Ads Worth Spreading, American Advertising Federation, FWA, The A-List Hollywood Awards, IAB Mixx, and Graphis.

Jasmine Plouffe, Brand Strategist

Jasmin is a brand strategist/graphic designer who helps female entrepreneurs attract their dream customers by sharing their story and taking their branding and graphic design to a whole new level.

Plus, our Selfmade Alum will be there to guide you along the way! Go from feeling alone to feeling deeply connected to a community of like-minded women. Our professional business and career coaches will encourage you to take the next step toward your biz goals via weekly Accountability Pods. Students will have access to a wide community of like-minded entrepreneurs, including experts, founders, future business partners, freelancers, and more.

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Ready to take your business idea to the next level? Enroll in Selfmade Summer session today!


Black Velvet Cocktail

The black velvet is an interesting mixed drink that combines ​​Champagne and dark beer in a single glass. One may think this an unlikely combination but it's actually quite good. It has been around for a very long time and may even be the original beer mixed drink!

Supposedly, the black velvet was created by a London steward. It was served while the country was in mourning over the 1861 death of Queen Victoria's husband, Prince Albert.

For the stout, Guinness Extra Stout is an excellent choice and the most common beer poured in this cocktail. If you're careful while pouring it, you can get the two ingredients to create the beautiful layers of pale sparkling wine with a thick black top and foamy head. It can be helpful to use the bartender's floating trick by pouring the beer over the back of a bar spoon to disrupt the flow. It's the secret behind other layered beer drinks like the black and tan.

The drink has been such a hit over the years that it inspired a few companies to bottle similar mixes over the years. However, it's rare that these last long on the market. That's not really a surprise because it's such an easy mix that anyone can pull off at home.


Champagne Six-Packs Have Arrived Just in Time for Picnic Season

Picnics just got a whole lot more bubbly, thanks to Moët & Chandon.

Real talk: We&aposre really not sure bringing Champagne to picnics was ever a thing. Lugging a huge glass bottle all the way to the park? No, thanks.

Well, anyway, now it can be. Just in time for all your Memorial Day vacations and roadtrips and other general excursions, Moët is offering tiny bottles of Champagne in six-packs. That means you and all your friends can tote around individual portions of the stuff without having to worry about toting around a massive, heavy bottle. Brilliant.

The six-packs have been dubbed the Moët Mini Share Pack. Cute name, right? Within each box come six 187-milliliter bottles of Moët’s classic Imperial Brut Champagne, and the innovative packaging seems as though it&aposd allow you to carry the box around using makeshift cardboard handles (just as you would a six-pack of beer). Each bottle also comes with "golden flute toppers," which mean you don&apost even have to bring cups.

That is, if you don&apost plan on drinking straight out of the bottle.

If all of this sounds too good to be true. it sort of is. The packs are available nationwide, but only if you shell out a cool $100.

Still, you&aposve got to admit that bubbly drinks make any special occasion feel more festive, and the mini bottles are just plain adorable. As Moët promised in a press release, "This new take on the classic six-pack is the perfect way to elevate any celebration, allowing guests to enjoy their own personal bottle of Champagne."

Anyway, if you&aposd rather not empty out your entire wallet, you can always head to New Orleans instead and try a single serving of mini Champagne at the Moët & Chandon vending machine.


Watch the video: Champagne Ataulfo mangoes in season. How to slice u0026 trivia.


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