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Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder with Savory Apple Gravy

Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder with Savory Apple Gravy


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The pork shoulder should be marinated in the rub overnight or up to two days.

Method

1 Make the spice rub: Put the fennel seeds, peppercorns, thyme and rosemary leaves, garlic and 2 teaspoons salt into a spice grinder or coffee grinder and grind to a paste.

Alternatively, you can pound the mixture with a mortar and pestle. Put the mixture into a bowl and stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil.

2 Marinate roast overnight in spice rub: Rub the mixture evenly all over the pork shoulder. If the roast is tied, untie it to rub the inside with the rub mixture as well, then retie it.

Wrap the roast tightly in plastic wrap to hold the rub against the skin and marinate overnight (or up to two days).

3 Prep apples and onions: Peel, halve, and core the apples. Cut each apple half into about 4 wedges. Peel the onions. Cut in half from tip to root. Trim the root and tip. Cut each onion half into about 12 thin wedges. Put the onions and the apples together in a bowl and toss to mix.

4 Preheat the oven to 450°F (232°C).

5 Place roast on bed of apples and onions: Toss the apples and onions with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and season with a little salt and pepper. Place the apples and onions in the bottom of a roasting pan or Dutch oven with a cover. Place the marinated pork shoulder on top of the apples and onions.

6 Roast: Roast uncovered for 30 minutes. Turn the oven heat down to 325°F and add the wine. Cover the roasting pan and slow roast for 2 1/2 to 3 hours until the pork shoulder is falling apart tender and pulls apart easily when probed with a fork.

7 Make sauce: Transfer the pork shoulder to a serving plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Put the apples and onions into a blender. Add about 1/2 cup water and the mustard and purée. Check the texture, and add water until you get the desired thickness for the gravy. Press through a sieve for a silky smooth textured gravy. Check the seasoning and correct to taste.

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Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder with Savory Apple Gravy

Now here’s a good one for a cold winter day. Talk about melt-in-your-mouth delicious!

A hefty pork shoulder is slathered with a rub of fennel seeds, pepper, thyme, rosemary, and garlic and set to marinate for a day or two in the fridge.

It is then nestled in a bed of sliced apples and onions, first browned on high heat in the oven, and then covered and allowed to cook low and slow, until it is almost falling apart.

You don’t need a knife to eat this slow-roasted pork shoulder. Just a big appetite.

We first encountered this recipe by Napa chef Maria Helm Sinskey in the Wall St. Journal years ago.

We’ve made just a few changes—reduced the salt rather dramatically, added some mustard, puréed and strained the gravy. I love this method of slow cooking a pork shoulder and think you will too!


Slow Roasted Pork Shoulder with Apple Gravy

The pork shoulder should be marinated in the rub overnight or up to two days.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons packed, fresh thyme leaves, lightly chopped, or 1 tablespoons dried thyme
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves, lightly chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fennel seeds, toasted
  • 2 teaspoons black peppercorns
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 4 medium garlic cloves, minced
  • Extra virgin olive oil (optional)
  • 4 to 5 pounds (1.8 to 2.2 kg) boneless pork shoulder, sinew and excess fat (beyond 1/4 inch) trimmed
  • 4 medium good cooking apples, such as Fuji or Jonagold
  • 1 medium yellow onion
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 cup (120 ml) dry white wine (can sub water)
  • 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • Freshly ground black pepper

Method

1 Make the spice rub: Put the fennel seeds, peppercorns, thyme and rosemary leaves, garlic and 2 teaspoons salt into a spice grinder or coffee grinder and grind to a paste. (Alternatively, you can pound the mixture with a mortar and pestle.)

Transfer the mixture into a bowl and stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil.

2 Marinate roast overnight in spice rub: Rub the mixture evenly all over the pork shoulder. If the roast is tied, untie it to rub the inside with the rub mixture as well, then retie it.

Wrap the roast tightly in plastic wrap to hold the rub against the skin and marinate overnight (or up to two days).

3 Prep apples and onions: Peel, halve, and core the apples. Cut each apple half into about 4 wedges. Peel the onions. Cut in half from tip to root. Trim the root and tip. Cut each onion half into about 12 thin wedges.

Put the onions and the apples together in a bowl, toss with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, and season with a little salt and pepper.

4 Preheat the oven to 450°F (232°C).

5 Place roast on bed of apples and onions: Place the apples and onions in the bottom of a roasting pan or Dutch oven with a cover. Place the marinated pork shoulder on top of the apples and onions.

6 Roast: Roast uncovered for 30 minutes. Turn the oven heat down to 325°F and add the wine. Cover the roasting pan and slow roast for 2 1/2 to 3 hours until the pork shoulder is falling apart tender and pulls apart easily when probed with a fork.

7 Make sauce: Transfer the pork shoulder to a serving plate and cover with foil to keep warm. Put the apples and onions into a blender. Add about 1/2 cup water and the mustard and purée.

Check the texture, and add water until you get the desired thickness for the gravy. Press through a sieve for a silky smooth textured gravy. Check the seasoning and correct to taste.

8 Serve: Cut the roast into pieces and serve with the apple gravy. Leftovers will keep refrigerated for up to 5 days or frozen for 3 months.

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Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat oven to 250°F (121°C).

Line a rimmed baking sheet with heavy duty aluminum foil (see note) and set a wire rack inside it. Place a piece of parchment paper on top of the wire rack. Season pork on all sides liberally with salt and pepper and place on parchment paper. Transfer to oven and roast until knife or fork inserted into side shows very little resistance when twisted, about 8 hours total.

Remove pork from oven and tent with foil. Let rest at room temperature for at least 15 minutes and up to 2 hours. Increase oven to 500°F and allow to preheat. Return pork to the oven and roast until skin is blistered and puffed, rotating every 5 minutes, about 20 minutes total. Remove from oven, tent with foil and allow to rest an additional 15 minutes. Serve by picking in the kitchen or just bring it to the table and let guests pick meat and crispy skin themselves, dipping into sauce of their choice on the side (see note).


Slow Cooking for Roast Pork Shoulder

Slow cooking pork shoulder in the oven means you are cooking it all day long. In fact, it’ll take you about 7 or 8 hours to get that mouth-watering, falling off the bone result.

I like a long, slow roast, especially in the fall and winter. There is nothing like filling your home with the aroma of a roasted meat in the oven.

So, I prepped the bone-in pork shoulder in the morning, put it in the oven, and basically forgot about it.


Roasted Pork Shoulder With Savory Apple Gravy

4-5 pounds pork shoulder, (I leave the fat on it)
1 TBSP fennel seeds, slightly toasted
2 tsp black peppercorns
2 TBSP packed, fresh thyme leaves, lightly chopped, or 1 TBSP dried thyme
2 TBSP fresh rosemary leaves, lightly chopped
4 medium garlic cloves, minced
2 tsp Kosher salt, plus more for seasoning
Extra virgin olive oil
Low or No-Carb apple flavoring
½ medium yellow onion + 1 tsp onion powder
½ cup (120 ml) dry white wine (can sub water)
½ tsp Dijon mustard
Freshly ground black pepper

INSTRUCTIONS

1 Make the spice rub: Put the fennel seeds (toast slightly first in a skillet over med heat), peppercorns, thyme and rosemary leaves, garlic and 2 teaspoons kosher salt into a spice grinder or coffee grinder and grind to a paste.

Alternatively, you can pound the mixture with a mortar and pestle. Put the mixture into a bowl and stir in 2 tablespoons olive oil.

2 Marinate roast overnight in spice rub: Rub the mixture evenly all over the pork shoulder. If the roast is tied, untie it to rub the inside with the rub mixture as well, then retie it. Wrap the roast tightly in several layers of plastic wrap to hold the rub against the skin and marinate overnight (or up to two days).

3 Prepare onion: Peel and cut onion from tip to root, trimming root and tip. Cut into thin wedges (I used ½ an onion for an 8 lb. roast to cut back on carbs, and used one packet of Alpine sugar-free spiced cider mix. The apple flavoring did not really come through, so would not use that again. I will use the REAL apple flavoring I have ordered next time to see how it works and update this recipe accordingly.)

4 Preheat the oven to 450°F (232°C).

5 Toss the onions with 2 tablespoons of olive oil, apple flavoring and onion powder, and a little salt and pepper. Place the apple-flavored onions in the bottom of a roasting pan or Dutch oven with a cover and place the marinated pork shoulder on top.

6 Roast: First roast uncovered for 30 minutes at 450°F. THEN turn the oven heat down to 325°F and add the wine (or water). Cover the roasting pan and slow roast for at least 2½ to 4 hours until the pork shoulder is falling apart tender and pulls apart easily when probed with a fork.

7 Make sauce: Transfer the pork shoulder to a serving plate and cover with foil to keep warm. FIRST, skim off excess fat, then pour remaining juices and cooked onions into a blender. Add the mustard and purée. Check the texture, and add hot water or stock until you get the desired thickness for a sauce or gravy. Press through a sieve for a silky smooth textured gravy. I then put this into a pan and on medium heat, add Thick-It-Up after it starts boiling to create a gravy / sauce. Check the seasoning and adjust to taste.


Slow-Cooked Pork Shoulder with Roasted Apples

Preheat the oven to 400°. Using a sharp knife, score the pork skin in a crosshatch pattern. Set the pork in a large roasting pan, skin side up.

In a spice grinder, combine the bay leaves with the juniper berries, 1/4 cup of salt and 2 teaspoons of pepper and grind into a powder. Rub the spice mixture all over the pork and into the scored skin. Roast the pork for 30 minutes, until lightly browned. Reduce the oven temperature to 325° and roast for about 6 1/2 hours longer, until the pork is very tender and the skin is crisp. Transfer to a carving board and let rest for 30 minutes.

Meanwhile, on a large rimmed baking sheet, toss the apples with the olive oil and cinnamon sticks and season generously with salt and pepper. Roast for about 30 minutes, tossing once, until the apples are lightly browned and softened slightly. Discard the cinnamon sticks.

Remove the pork skin and coarsely chop it. Using 2 forks, pull the pork into large pieces, discarding the fat and bones. Transfer the pork to a platter and scatter the chopped skin on top. Serve with the roasted apples.


Pork Roast with Gravy

I am such a winter food girl. Soup, stews, fresh bread, and especially roasts with lots of mashed potatoes and gravy. Spring rolls around and I kind of flail for a bit getting back into the summer food swing of things. Good thing it is only March and I still have another month left of winter food wonderfulness, including this pork roast with gravy.

If you are going to bother with gravy, go all out. This gravy here is NO bouillon, and completely from scratch. It is packed with flavor, and it cannot be beaten. This post is going to differ a bit from most, as it will be more of a method than a recipe. You just never know what quantity of drippings you will get off any cut of meat, so feel free to improvise a bit, as always.

How to roast a pork roast in the oven

Start by buying a good bone-in pork shoulder roast. This one was about 4-5 pound I believe. You can find these for under $10 if you check the sales frequently.

Season the roast liberally with salt, pepper, onion powder, garlic powder, and some seasoning salt. I like Johnny&rsquos, but your favorite would be fine as well.

Heat 3-4 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat in a skillet (cast iron works GREAT for this!), and brown the roast on all sides. Put it into a roasting pan that&rsquos been sprayed with cooking spray.

Now lightly cook an onion that&rsquos been sliced the long way, and cook until it is starting to get a bit tender and lightly browned.

Now pour 1/2 cup of dry white wine, 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, and 1/2 cup of apple juice into the pan to deglaze. Stir well and get all the browned bits off the bottom, and then pour the whole thing over the roast in the pan.

Cover the pan and roast at 275-300 for 4-5 hours, or until the roast is fall-apart tender. The amount of time it takes will vary depending on how big your roast is, how accurate your oven temp is, as well as the size of your pan and various other factors. Figure on at least 4 hours for a decent sized roast though.

30 minutes before you will be serving dinner, remove the pan and remove all the juices from the bottom of the pan. See this little thing? It is a fat separator and it is one of my very favorite kitchen gadgets. It makes this gravy making process SO much easier.

You see that layer of fat below? We need the fat to be separated from the drippings. If you don&rsquot have one of these nifty separators yet, you can get the job done with a spoon and some time. Just make sure you don&rsquot get drippings in with the fat.

Place the fatless drippings into a pot, add a cup or two of water, to taste. You want enough so that the gravy isn&rsquot too salty, but not too much that you need to add salt or bouillon. I added about a cup and a half. Bring that to a boil, stirring frequently. After it boils, reduce the heat to medium-low, and let it simmer while you make the roux.

To make the roux, take the fat from the drippings and put it into a small pan. Heat over low heat, and simmer for 2-3 minutes to cook out any remaining watery drippings that may have slipped in there.

Once you have pure fat, go ahead and whisk in a generous handful of flour. You want it to be thick, but still pourable. You&rsquoll reach this consistency by adding just under equal parts of flour to the fat. So if you have 1/2 cup of fat, add JUST shy of 1/2 cup of flour. If you accidentally add too much flour, you can toss in a tablespoon or two of butter to thin it out again.

Simmer over low heat, stirring constantly. Make sure if you are using a non-stick pan to use a silicone coated whisk! Cook this roux for about 3-5 minutes, stirring constantly, and then pour slowly into the simmering broth while stirring it, and cook until thickened.

Remove the roast from the oven.

Pull off some big chunks and serve with mashed potatoes, corn, and some fresh rolls.

Do you mix your corn and potatoes? It is my FAVORITE. I can hardly even eat mashed potatoes without some corn mixed in!


Click Here to Pin this Recipe for Slow Roasted Pork with Apple Puree

Apples and pork are a match made in heaven, aren&rsquot they? Especially in this dish because every single one of the flavors blend so well as they roast together , and as a result, it truly does taste heavenly.Once the apples and onions are blended with a blender, they from a thick sauce very similar to gravy which is served over the meat.

This dinner is a hands-off recipe that tastes amazing, and just perfect for a Sunday dinner or to serve to guests. When pork is slow roasted, it becomes extremely tender and almost falls apart. You can shred the pork into chunky pieces or finer shreds and mix all of the yummy sauce into the pork for sandwiches topped with coleslaw. Or you can try our personal favorite which is with a side of smashed potatoes and roasted butternut squash or citrus roasted Brussels sprouts.


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Slow-roasted shoulder of pork

For me, the most sublime pork roast imaginable is one that is cooked for a very long time at a very low temperature until the meat is so tender that it falls apart if you look at it and exhale. First seared and rubbed with herbs, this meat will smell divine as soon as it hits the heat, and it will continue filling the house with heavenly aromas all through the cooking day, which can last from sunup to darkness. The meat is ready when it is “fork tender,” or, I would go so far as to say, “meat pudding.”

In central Italy, summer evenings are greeted with the intoxicating aroma of porchetta cooking in fennel and garlic, rock salt and peppercorns. At most open-air food markets around the country, the lines are always longest at the porchetta stand, where these most delicious of sandwiches come un-relished and dripping with juice. Any cook who has eaten porchetta in Italy would probably only dream of replicating this dish -- a whole pig boned and slow roasted in a wood-burning oven -- at home.

Lately, L.A.'s chefs have been turning out some splendid porchetta.

Over at Rocca restaurant in Santa Monica, Tuesday night is known as “the celebration of the pig.” But the celebration begins on Saturday, when chef-owner Don Dickman receives a shipment from Niman Ranch: a 100-pound pig in a white box. Dickman oversees the Saturday preparation of porchetta, which involves lancing the meat and vigorously massaging it with a “pesto” made from fresh rosemary, whole fennel seeds, garlic, olive oil and kosher salt. (As Dickman puts it, “It’s not just rubbed we get it in there big time”). It will marinate until Tuesday, when it will be cooked for five to six hours at 300 degrees.

Then, on Tuesday night, a diner at Rocca gets a plate of well-seasoned porchetta and sides of salsa verde (a piquant anchovy-parsley sauce), fruit mostarda (applesauce with dry mustard and mustard seed) and a vegetable (lately it has been broccoli rabe ). This is a fragrant and satisfying dinner -- rustic in the sense that it is a plate full of meat, fat and bones, the kind you pick your way through and in which every bite might differ from the last. The crispy skin is the crowning achievement, and you tend to portion it so you can have some with every forkful.

At Angelini Osteria on Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles, Gino Angelini serves his version on Saturday night it’s not really porchetta but a pork leg. Seasoned beautifully with fennel seed, garlic and a bay leaf, a leg is cooked for about four hours at 350 degrees, then sliced at the table. At Lucques, Suzanne Goin serves her porchetta -- in this case, suckling pig -- about eight weeks out of the year, depending on when she gets hold of the meat. She marinates it in rock salt, thyme, rosemary and sage for three hours, then does a confit -- that is, she submerges it at 225 degrees in duck or pig fat overnight, about seven hours. At La Buca on Melrose, Loredana Cecchinato serves her porchetta -- also leg -- about once a month, dry-roasting it unadorned in salt and pepper.

As unlikely as it might sound, it is a simple matter for the home cook to achieve a remarkable porchetta facsimile -- the dripping juice, the melting meat -- and without coming face-to-face with Babe. You just need the right cut, and you want to cook it for longer and at a lower heat than the chefs are doing. The dish you’re actually cooking is spalla di maiale arrostita tentamente (slow-roasted shoulder of pork). Not a lot of work is required a little prep, a little attention and a lot of slow roasting will net you a dish that is so tender it will make a grown man cry.

Slow-cooking a pork shoulder means choosing one of two cuts of meat. The proper shoulder is called the Boston butt or pork butt (and, incidentally, the actual “butt” is called pork leg). This is the best, most flavorful cut. If you want to serve skin, however, you’ll need the picnic roast, or picnic shoulder. The underside of the shoulder, this cut has more sinew and tendons than the butt roast. Slow roasting melts away much of the fat and sinew. You’ll either have to order a skin-on picnic roast from your butcher, or look for it in groceries in neighborhoods with strong Latino and Chinese populations.

Bruce Aidells, sausage impresario and author of “Bruce Aidells’s Complete Book of Pork,” says both the butt and the picnic cuts have their strong points, and both are better for roasting than the leaner loin cuts. “Pork producers sell many more loin chops than they do shoulders,” he says. Both he and pork producers find that to be a shame. For his slow-roast pork, Aidells uses the picnic roast, even though “there’s a fair amount of grizzle” running through it. “It’s dirt cheap,” he says. “You can’t get nice slices from it, but that doesn’t matter because we’re talking about a falling-apart kind of roast.” Still, he admits the butt roast is just the nicer cut. “There’s a lot more meat on the butt and a lot less waste.”

For our part, we roasted both picnic and butt roasts, and we are now all about the butt roast. It consistently gave us an incredibly tender, juicy, falling-apart meat with a wonderful flavor. While we loved the crispy skin you can get with a picnic roast, we found that cut to be unpredictable correct cooking times varied widely as did flavor -- some of the roasts achieved wonderfulness but others never got as tender and full of flavor as the porchetta of our dreams.

I had heard tell of a great, long-roasted recipe from “The Cafe Cook Book: Italian Recipes from London’s River Cafe” by Rose Gray and Ruth Rogers. This method, the legend went, truly approached porchetta as done in Italy. With its garlic, fennel seed and red chile, the flavor combination is fairly classic it can also be found (plus rosemary) in Aidells’ pork book.

Using the Gray and Rogers recipe as a jumping-off point, we cooked what seemed like 900 porchettas (OK, maybe 10 or 12), in order to determine the best cooking time and method.

First you score or lance the meat and rub in the herbs. Next, brown the roast in a heavy enamel cast-iron pot (Le Creuset works very well). Pour on lemon juice and chicken broth. Gray and Rogers say it can go for as long as 24 hours we beg to differ. After 16 hours the meat dries out and takes on an ominous stormy look and starts to lose flavor.

Here’s what we say: Let the roasting commence. Begin with the pot uncovered at 450 degrees after half an hour, cover it, and turn the heat down to 250. Eight hours, 10 hours -- you and your fork will be the judge. This produces the moistest, most pudding-like results. As for the bone-in/bone-out question: both are equally good. But bone-out is easier to find. If you opt for bone-in, add an hour of cooking time.

This, we feel, is the perfect porchetta. Even if it really isn’t porchetta.


Watch the video: Mexicansk chorizogryde med hakket svinekød


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