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Lesbian Couple Responds to Sexist Chef With Epic Note on Their Receipt

Lesbian Couple Responds to Sexist Chef With Epic Note on Their Receipt


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A lesbian couple left an amazing note for a chef who said ‘it’s such a waste to not have a man’ on Valentine’s Day

This couple was only trying to enjoy a Valentine’s Day dinner out, when they experienced this troubling act of sexism.

Two women were just trying to enjoy a romantic dinner at a restaurant in Lafayette, Indiana when their evening was interrupted by the restaurant’s chef who lamented their sexual orientation.

Ellie Parker and her girlfriend Lucy were at the Asahi Japanese Steakhouse in Lafayette, Indiana when the chef came out and greeted them. According to their Facebook post complaining of the incident, “We told him we were each other’s Valentines. Clearly a couple. He proceeds to say ‘well it is legal, but it’s such a waste to not have a man.’” The chef then allegedly suggested that he could “come home with them to heat things up.”

The couple decided to get revenge on the restaurant’s alarmingly sexist and homophobic chef by writing on their receipt: “Don’t tell lesbians they need a man on Valentine’s Day,” in the spot reserved for a tip.

“I cannot believe I paid over $50 to have my relationship insulted and sexualized,” Ellie said.

The Facebook page for the Asahi Japanese Steakhouse has since been deactivated. The Daily Meal has reached out to the restaurant for comment.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.


What Happens to Your Body When You Eat Pasta

Whether it's a hearty bowl of bolognese or garlicky pesto tortellini, there's hardly a dish more worth drooling than pasta. Need a quick meal to whip up for a family of four? All you need is a box of penne and a jar of marinara. Cooking a romantic dinner for two? A rich carbonara should do the trick. But what happens to your body when you eat pasta? Can it ever be healthy? And how can you make sure you're reaping all the rewards without compromising your waistline?

According to a 2011 survey by Oxfam, pasta is the world's most popular dish (ahead of meat, rice, and pizza). Another 2013 study found that a whopping 59% of U.S. adults eat pasta at least once a week. Clearly, pasta is a household staple for Americans, and it makes sense, too: it's cheap, it's filling, and it's super versatile.

Like all foods, eating pasta comes with both potential benefits as well as risks—depending on what kind and how much you're consuming. That said, nutritionists agree that no one food can make or break your health.

"When consumed within the context of a well-balanced, nutrient-rich, high-quality diet, pasta can peacefully fit into your life without being at odds with your health," says Lindsey Kane, RD and Director of Nutrition at Sun Basket. "It's time to ditch the pasta-phobia once and for all."

Wondering what happens when you chow down on that weekly bowl of spaghetti? Here are some of the effects experts want you to know about when you eat pasta, and for more healthy eating tips, be sure to check out our list of 21 Best Healthy Cooking Hacks of All Time.



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