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The Impossible Burger Is Finally Coming to Grocery Stores

The Impossible Burger Is Finally Coming to Grocery Stores


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Home cooks, start your grills

Photo modified: Courtesy of Impossible Foods

The Impossible Burger first launched in 2016 and quickly made its way onto menus at 17,000 restaurants nationwide, including Momofuku Nishi, The Butcher’s Daughter and some of your favorite fast food joints like White Castle and Burger King. But all this time, the famous “bleeding” meatless patty had never been available to home cooks for purchase at the grocery store — until now.

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The Impossible Burger is finally making its way to supermarket shelves on Sept. 20. (One of its primary competitors, Beyond Meat, has sold its products in grocery stores since 2016.) The hyperrealistic plant-based “meat” — which tastes, feels and smells just like beef — will be debuting at 27 Gelson’s Markets in Southern California. Most locations are in and around Los Angeles, but there are others in Santa Barbara down through San Diego and Palm Springs.

The bioengineered Impossible Burger is kosher, halal and gluten-free certified with no cholesterol, 14 grams of fat, 8 grams of saturated fat and 240 calories per serving. A 12-ounce ground beef-style package will set you back about $8.99, and Gelson’s customers are limited to purchasing 10 packages per visit.

If you live in LA, you can get a free sample of the Impossible Burger at the brand’s launch party on the third floor of the Westfield Century City Cabana from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. PST on Sept. 20 while supplies last. A “diverse crew of grandmas” will be cooking their favorite dishes for shoppers at the center, according to a statement from Impossible Foods.

If you don't live near a Gelson's, don't worry. Impossible Foods is slated to announce additional retailers, including ones on the East Coast, in late September, followed by a nationwide rollout by mid-2020. While your average package of ground beef costs about half as much as the meatless Impossible Burger, its positive environmental impact and plant-based deliciousness certainly makes it a grocery item worth the splurge.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


The Impossible burger has 1 major flaw to overcome: It's nearly triple the price of normal ground beef

At most grocery stores, you'll pay anywhere from $3 to $8 for a pound of ground beef.

More often than not, you're paying under $5/lb. — we're talking about ground beef here, not prime rib.

It's pretty rare to pay the higher end of that spectrum, even here in New York City. I had to call the fanciest butcher shop in Brooklyn, The Meat Hook, which prides itself on being a more labor-intensive whole-animal butchery, to find ground beef that costs $8 a pound.

That's why I was so shocked to find out that Impossible Foods, which aims to replace beef with its own vegetarian beef option, is selling less than a pound of its ground "meat" — 12 ounces — for $9.

That's a pretty stark comparison to the $3 you could pay for 16 oz. (1 lb.) of ground beef.

For some folks, the high price is worth it. "Fortunately, we have more demand than we can handle at our current price, " Impossible Foods CEO Pat Brown told me during an Impossible Foods event in New York City on Thursday.

Impossible's only offering its veggie beef in a handful of regional supermarket chains to start, before ramping up to national chains and, the company hopes, expanding internationally. It's one of the first steps in Impossible's plan to lower cost, broaden availability, and convince the general public that its version of veggie beef is a better option than ground beef.

"We're scaling up right now from tiny to big," Brown said. "And it's only when we get to a bigger scale when we realize the advantages of our process. Our goal is to get our prices affordable to everybody in the world, not just even in the US but in the developing world, as fast as we possibly can. But it doesn't happen instantly, and we can't sell our products at a loss if we want to stay in business."

As Impossible's "meat" becomes more popular, its price should correspondingly decrease as its makers feel more of the financial benefits of the company's more environmentally friendly approach to food creation. It's a reasonable plan, but — in the meantime — it makes Impossible's meat replacement hard to suggest for most people.


Watch the video: The Strange Science of the Impossible Burger. WIRED


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