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Eataly Confirms Chicago Location, Promises Tons of Sausages

Eataly Confirms Chicago Location, Promises Tons of Sausages


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The Italian megastore slash food hall will take over the former ESPN Zone

After much rumormongering and twiddling our thumbs, Joe Bastianich and Mario Batali have finally confirmed the new location of Eataly in Chicago, their Italian megastore slash restaurant slash grocery store.

Chicago's Eataly will take up some 60,000 square feet of retail space in a former ESPN Zone on Ohio Street near Michigan Avenue, the New York Times reports. This will be the 20th Eataly worldwide, with other outposts in New York, Italy, and Japan.

Since the Windy City is home to many a gourmet marketplace and sausage place (ahem Gene's), Bastianich promises that Eataly will get their sausage inventory up to par, plus offer a grill restaurant "in homage to the Eastern European tradition of sausage in Chicago," Bastianich said. Last we heard, the Chicago location might just have more restaurants than New York, space permitting.

They plan to open the new store in September 2013. Further expansion plans involve Los Angeles, Istanbul, São Paulo, and Bari, Italy.


Malcolm Reed's Chuck Roast Burnt Ends

Finally got around to trying Malcom Reed's Chuck Roast Burnt Ends today. They were a big hit, and I left the (very few) leftovers for my Father-in-law to enjoy tomorrow. The receipe was really easy, and I'll definitely be using it again.

Grills / Smokers
*********************************************

Kingsford 24" grill (Free) 'Billy'
Brinkmann Smoke n Grill
Oklahoma Joe Highland, gaskets, LavaLock baffle / tuning plate. 'Big Joe'
Weber 18" Kettle ($30 CL) 'Lil' Feller'
Weber Smokey Joe ($25 CL) 'Lil' Brother'
Weber 22.5 Master Touch '93 P Code Blue($85) from fellow WKC member Bmitch 'Elwood'
Weber 22.5 Bar-B-Q Kettle '69-'70 "Patent Pending" Red ($80) from fellow WKC member dwnthehatch 'Maureen'
Weber 22.5 OTS DD Code Black ($40 CL) 'DeeDee'
Weber 22.5 OTS DO Code Black ($15 CL)
Weber 22.5 OTS E Code Black ($20 CL
Weber 22.5 OTS EE Code Black ($20 CL

Weber "C" Code 18.5" WSM '81 ($50 CL) 8-0.
Weber "H" Code 18.5" WSM '86 ($75 CL)
Weber " " Code 18.5" WSM

Weber 26.75, $199 NFM clearance .
Weber SJS AH 'Lil' Brother'
Weber SJS AT 'Lil' Sister'
Weber SJS DE Code (FREE) 'Lil' Helper'
Weber SJG M Code 'Lil Traveller'
Weber SJS AH Code 'Kermit' (Lime Green)
Horizon 20" Classic, w/baffle/tuning plate (FREE)
Good One Open Range, (FREE), Monthly Prize from AR giveaway.


Thermometers:
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Ol' Skool Bi-metal probe pocket thermo, that has checked / served

1,000,000 meals in my possession, easily.
Maverick ET-732, (Black)
Thermopops, (Red, Yellow, Green)
ThermaPen Mk4 (Black), THANKS. to jgjeske1
Blue ThermaPen Mk4
Orange Thermapen Mk4
Pink Thermapen Mk4
ThermoWorks IR-GUN-S
ThermoWorks Smoke
ThermoWorks Open Box Smoke
4 Pro Series cable extensions
Smoke Gateway

Accessories:
*********************************************
2 Slow 'N Sears, Slow 'N Sear XL, Grill 'N Griddle
BBQ Vortex, 2 Hovergrills, Top Deck
Warming shelf
MyWeigh KD-8000Kitchen Scale
Backyard Grill marinade injector
Acoustic Guitars/Electric Guitars/Basses/1928 National Duolian/Harmonicas/Banjo Washboard, Spoons, kazoos, pocket comb with wax paper, egg shakers -)
Bear Paws
Meat Rakes
BBQ Dragon/Chimley of Insanity, Dragon Wing Shelves (x2 ea.)

Cookware:
Probably a ton of cast iron, mostly very old. still cookin'
G'Ma's Piqua skillet, :-)( They went out of business in 1934

)
'60's Revere Ware (Mom's), + others found elsewhere
60's CorningWare 10-cup percolator (Mom's) Daily driver
50's CorningWare 10-cup percolator (G'Ma's), for a backup! -)
Carpy Wally World stock pots, in approx 2 gal/3gal sizes, blue speckledty-porcelain enameled
Tramontina 6.5 qt Dutch Oven

Cutlery, etc.:
Shi*-ton of kitchen/chef knives, most sharper than my straight-razors are. (Better steel!) Chicago Cutlery, Old Hickory, various, including some nice German stuff -)
Dexter 12" slicing knife, 6" Sani-Safe boning knife
Smith's Tri-Hone Natural Arkansas Knife Sharpening System
Multiple steels, from all over the planet
Crock sticks
Diamond stones, various
Lansky Sharpening System

Tableware
Daily driver:Washington Forge Mardi Gras, Navy / Cobalt Blue
Dinner: Guests: Washington Forge, Town and Country
Fancy / Formal: Family silverware


The Great Migration: The first wave

American Barbecue is a happy marriage of the smoked meat traditions brought to the new world by European explorers, the primitive cooking techniques of the Native Americans, and the discovery of tomatoes and hot peppers in Central and South America. It evolved under the watchful eyes of African American slaves and cooks, who took tough cuts of meat and found a way to coax them to yield delicacies.

Jean Baptiste Point DuSable is believed to have been the first settler of European descent when he opened a trading post on the south bank of the Chicago River near where it met Lake Michigan. He was black, probably French Canadian, and married a Potawatomi woman. Grilling, roasting, and rotisserie is an integral part of both cultures.

With the Underground Railroad prior to the Civil War, African Americans brought their cooking culture and settled in with the North what eventually became soul food.

After the Civil War there was a steady trickle of migration to northern cities in pursuit of jobs. It culminated in a wave called The Great Migration from 1910 to 1930 as an estimated two million blacks, many farm hands, tenant farmers, and sharecroppers from the Mississippi Delta, moved north to find work.

The Delta is where the Yazoo River system drains into the Mississippi River in Northeastern Mississippi and Eastern Arkansas just south of Memphis and north of Vicksburg. Many were displaced by mechanization, many by racism, and many by Jim Crow “separate but equal” laws. They brought with them barbecue as well as the blues and settled on the South and West sides of Chicago.

Chicago’s African American population grew from about 4,000 in 1870 to about 15,000 in 1890, 40,000 in 1910, and 90,000 in 1920. Southside culture grew with a local black newspapers, radio, night clubs, merchants, and restaurants. Chicago Jazz flourished in the 1920s with night clubs featuring Southerners like King Oliver and Louis Armstrong (Struttin With Some Barbecue).

The Pullman Corporation on the Southside of Chicago became a major employer. By the mid 1920s, while train traveling was peaking, more than 20,000 African American men worked as Pullman porters and other train jobs, the largest category of labor for blacks in the US. They carried luggage, shined shoes, made beds, and made good money and tips while they saw the country. Many of their wives became domestic help. They became the first black middle class in the nation.

The Great Depression which started in 1929 killed many of their jobs, and almost half the black community was unemployed. Migration from the South slowed.

There were not many barbecue restaurants in Chicago that I could find until after WWII.


Health

Tiny 'hearts' self-assemble in lab dishes and even beat like the real thing

The new heart organoids offer a unique way to study early human development.

Too much TV may be bad for your long-term brain health

The researchers used TV viewing as a proxy for sedentary behavior.

Mysterious neurological symptoms are appearing in US diplomats and spies around the world

Approximately 60 U.S. personnel stationed around the world have complained of mysterious neurological symptoms that may be linked to the use of a microwave weapon.


Horror of the BSE school dinner risk

Large quantities of 'BSE risk' meat sludge found its way into school lunches for up to 15 years.

Some 75,000 tons of mechanically recovered meat (MRM), blasted from the bones of cattle with water jets, was used in economy foods, a study reveals.

A further 150,000 tons of meat from heads, including cheeks and lips, which was later banned as a risk, was used, often in schools and hospitals.

The scandal was exposed yesterday in a report by the Food Standards Agency, which shed new light on the risk to human health of BSE.

The findings horrified families who lost loved ones to CJD, the human form of BSE. Lester Firkins, chairman of the Human BSE Foundation, a charity set up by victims' families, said: 'The fact that this stuff was getting into school dinners is repulsive.

'The average age of those people who have died is 27. We are left wondering whether school dinners was the common factor.

'No sensible parent would knowingly have allowed their children to eat that sort of food.

'You assume that what children are given at school is better than you'd get at a fast-food restaurant. That wasn't the case.

'The schools and other authorities should have made checks about the quality of the food they were using. Even today we do not know exactly what ends up on our plates.'

Mr Firkins lost his son Ellis, a 25-year-old teacher, to CJD last year.

The FSA says that MRM was being fed to humans at the rate of 5,000 tons a year from 1980 to 1995, which covered the years that BSE was rife in cattle.

Head meat was routinely included in economy foods at the rate of 10,000 tons a year for the same period.

Assuming it was used at a rate of around 15 per cent of the contents, the MRM alone could equate to 4.5billion burgers over 15 years.

The study shows that in the late 1980s, every part of the carcass was used in food production.

Frozen brains were exported to France while 'rectums were cleaned and salted and exported to Germany for sausages'.

The FSA suggests that 40 per cent of MRM went into cheap mince, another 40 per cent into economy burgers and the rest to other uses such as pies, sausages and patés.

Some of the MRM, although it is likely to have been a small quantity, may even have been included in processed baby food and beef stock cubes.

The mince and burgers would have been eaten in schools or available as economy lines from supermarkets. Many of the burgers were sold at fairs and football matches.

As much as 50 per cent of cheap mince was made up from head meat, which was used heavily in schools and hospitals.

The report points out: 'Institutional buyers, such as schools and hospitals. put constant pressure on suppliers to reduce prices.

'There were only so many ways this could be achieved - one of which was using bovine MRM. In addition, head meat would have been a standard ingredient.'

The report comes in spite of what appeared to be a concerted attempt by the processing industry to keep details secret.

A year ago, the Government's BSE expert committee, SEAC, complained that manufacturers had stalled and blocked all attempts to get information on the use of MRM.

Eventually it asked the FSA to launch an inquiry, which involved face-to-face meetings with industry executives, many now retired.

While all the MRM and head meat carried a theoretical risk, only about 10 per cent would have come from older animals, those most likely to carry infection.

SEAC chairman, Professor Peter Smith, said last night: 'This study goes a long way to confirm what we suspected. A lot of individuals will have been exposed to this meat.'

The findings will be studied by scientists at the CJD suveillance unit in Edinburgh and the use of beef 'head meat' will be further explored. It is banned in Britain and Portugal but is still used in other EU states.


Chopped

Fans pick the mystery ingredients in the all-new $50,000 tournament.

Stream What You Love

Inside the Competition

Top 10 Mistakes 12 Photos

Some chefs fall to the most-common errors in the kitchen.

The Exclusive Look 9 Photos

Get a behind-the-scenes peek into the making of Chopped.

The Best of After Hours 61 Photos

From top moments to crazy mishaps, see what happens.

Judge Exclusives

Best Reactions 21 Photos

As dramatic battles unfold, the judges can't hold back.

Loving Their Jobs 11 Photos

Each judge reveals a favorite thing about the show.

Chopped Extras

Unforgettable Cooks 9 Photos

Ted names the chefs who left the biggest mark on him.

Cooking Through the Seasons with Chopped: Spring 13 Photos

Get inspiration for cooking with these springtime foods at home.

Chopped Junior

Kid cooks take on the mystery baskets in the pintsize series.

Chopped Cookbook

Get the book with recipes inspired by the show's mystery basket ingredients.

Episodes

Fat Chance

The appetizer round prompts a couple of critical questions -- namely, what in the world is a narutomaki, and what are you supposed to do with it? The judges are astonished when one of the chefs takes an extremely unusual approach with the fish from the entree basket that also includes caul fat. Finally, the last two chefs attempt to make scrumptious dishes in the dessert round with Swedish syrup and a classic cookie.

Deadly Catch

The chefs face an adrenaline-packed competition filled with daunting seafood ingredients. A prized surprise awaits them in the first basket and a shocking salad meets a beautiful fish in the entree round. Finally, the judges temper their expectations as the chefs face an extraordinarily tough dessert basket.

Quail Without Fail

The four competing chefs have a lot to sort out in the appetizer round when they're challenged to create plates with a Korean dish made with intestines and a super spicy condiment. The three remaining competitors attempt to make successful quail entrees, and a shaker of Australian seasoning and a jar of Mexican caramel are two of the surprises in the dessert basket.

Taco Brawl

Let's taco 'bout it! Four chefs attempt to prove who deserves to win all the dinero for their all-taco meal. A frantic first round leads to some missteps in the kitchen, and fish tacos are in order for the entree round, when the chefs find red snapper in the baskets. In the dessert round, a festive cocktail is part of the puzzle, but will the judges be toasting the chefs' final plates?

Pancake Panic

The competing chefs get a ton of sugar in the first basket in the form of a breakfast classic with a twist, and the level of cooking in the entree round seems extraordinary as the chefs excitedly dig into a seven-layer dip. In the dessert round, the remaining chefs are happy to see loquats in the basket, but ice cream machine drama threatens their plans.

Holy Bologna!

Four chefs are forced to get creative from the start when they find a kitschy, oddball cake and an unusual hybrid veggie in their appetizer baskets. An offal surprise and a fun fungus dish keep things interesting in round two. In the final round, an ice cream mishap leaves one of the chefs scrambling to put a key lime dessert together.

Taco Brawl

Let's taco 'bout it! Four chefs attempt to prove who deserves to win all the dinero for their all-taco meal. A frantic first round leads to some missteps in the kitchen, and fish tacos are in order for the entree round, when the chefs find red snapper in the baskets. In the dessert round, a festive cocktail is part of the puzzle, but will the judges be toasting the chefs' final plates?

Pancake Panic

The competing chefs get a ton of sugar in the first basket in the form of a breakfast classic with a twist, and the level of cooking in the entree round seems extraordinary as the chefs excitedly dig into a seven-layer dip. In the dessert round, the remaining chefs are happy to see loquats in the basket, but ice cream machine drama threatens their plans.

Holy Bologna!

Four chefs are forced to get creative from the start when they find a kitschy, oddball cake and an unusual hybrid veggie in their appetizer baskets. An offal surprise and a fun fungus dish keep things interesting in round two. In the final round, an ice cream mishap leaves one of the chefs scrambling to put a key lime dessert together.

Quail Without Fail

The four competing chefs have a lot to sort out in the appetizer round when they're challenged to create plates with a Korean dish made with intestines and a super spicy condiment. The three remaining competitors attempt to make successful quail entrees, and a shaker of Australian seasoning and a jar of Mexican caramel are two of the surprises in the dessert basket.

Viewers' Choice!

Let's hear it for fan participation! Chopped viewers finally get their chance to weigh in on a weighty question: What should go into the mystery baskets? In the first round of this special competition, the chefs must figure out how to make the fans proud by cooking a dish made with a favorite regional meat product. Then for the entrée round, the viewers have chosen a jarred ingredient that few professional chefs are likely to like. Will one chef's ambitious plans backfire as the clock runs out? Then, while trying to figure out how to combine black licorice root with a salty snack food, one of the final two chefs uses a clever time-saving technique in the dessert round.

Big Fish, Small Basket

The competitors leap into action and come out strong with four impressive appetizers, made with seitan and mezcal. In the second round, pre-made sauce and a sizable fish are in the basket. When the two finalists proceed to dessert, they must make a pastry and a pork product play nicely on their plates.

Return and Redeem

Four chefs who lost in previous competitions return, wanting the win more than ever. A bright green dessert and a seafood snack must be worked into the competitors' appetizers. Then in the entree round, the chefs must contend with quinoa and sour candy. And with one more chance to redeem themselves, the two finalists fight to the end, as they make desserts from palm seeds and dulce de leche.

Family Affair

A mom, dad, son and aunt who work in the same restaurant meet in the Chopped Kitchen, where it's every chef for themselves. In the first round, one family member's grill pan gets taken over by two relatives. In the entree round, chicken breasts seem like an easy protein to work with, but how will the chefs fare with the other mystery ingredients? The final two family members make desserts using dried fruit and a very sweet cake.

Squab Goals

An ingredient basket containing squab kicks off an action-packed first round in the Chopped kitchen. As the chefs endeavor to make great entrees in round two, they must break down a large fish and figure out what to do with a sweet beverage. Cookie mix in the dessert basket seems like a breeze, but the variety of cookie mix may give the competitors pause.

Grill Masters: Kansas City

Big flavors meet big personalities as regional rivals from the thriving Kansas City barbecue world compete to see who will advance to the $50,000 Grill Masters grand finale and face winners from Texas, North Carolina and Memphis. A 20-minute appetizer round doesn't seem long enough to deal with the double cut pork chops in the first basket. Then, a bubbly surprise in the second basket prompts the chefs to bring the sweet to their entree dishes. Pineapple and banana are two of the flavors that must be married on the last two competitors' dessert plates.

Grill Masters: North Carolina

Pride is on the line as four regional rivals all deeply devoted to North Carolina-style barbecue battle it out in a thrilling, grilling heat to see who will represent their region in the $50,000 Grill Masters grand finale against winners from Texas, Memphis and Kansas City. Will fish in the first basket throw the pork-loving pitmasters off their game? The three chefs who move on to the entree round are surprised to have to work with liver. Finally, some Southern favorites in the dessert basket give the last two Tar Heel State competitors a head start in bringing Carolina flavors to their sweet plates.

Grill Masters: Memphis

Four chefs who live and breathe Memphis-style barbecue compete for a coveted spot in the $50,000 Grill Masters grand finale, facing off against champions from Texas, North Carolina and Kansas City. Tennessee tradition abounds in the first basket, which includes a creative take on a messy, shareable comfort food, and the chefs are stunned to see a gigantic sandwich in the second basket. Peaches in the dessert basket seem like a gift, but will the last two Memphis-style chefs be able to make them shine on their plates?

Grill Masters: Texas

Four passionate grill masters compete in a fiery battle to become the lone representative from the Lone Star State to advance to the $50,000 Grill Masters grand finale and face winners from Memphis, Kansas City and North Carolina. A creepy, crawly, crunchy surprise challenges the chefs in the first round, and a state fair treat and an iconic Texas meat meet in the second basket. The final basket holds Texas-inspired ingredients, but can the last two competitors find a good use for them in their desserts?

Grill Masters: Finale Showdown

Four Grill Masters champions representing their regional styles -- Texas, Memphis, North Carolina and Kansas City -- return to compete in this do-or-die grand finale with $50,000 and an enormous amount of pride on the line. A wild, smoky ingredient in the first basket kicks things off, and then the judges expect magnificent meat-and-potatoes entree plates from the three remaining champs. The adrenaline-filled grand finale dessert round featuring sugary, festive ingredients will decide which champion can pull off a sweet victory and walk away with the prize.

Gefilte Dish

The chefs get some surprises in the ingredient baskets, starting with the appetizer round, when they have to make gefilte fish work with something super sweet and something soft and salty. The judges are excited to see a beautiful pork product in the entree basket, but will the chefs treat it right? And a particularly strange collection of ingredients in the dessert basket leaves the remaining two chefs scrambling to solve the final culinary puzzle.

Pork on the Brain

Everyone goes hog wild in the Chopped Kitchen as the chefs take on a pork-themed competition. The first basket threatens to contain too much of a good thing, and a beautiful cut of heritage-breed pork is juxtaposed with a questionable canned product in the entree round, sending the chefs in some creative directions with their dishes. While they would have welcomed bacon in round three, the finalists must make use of more unusual porky items in their desserts.

Gefilte Dish

The chefs get some surprises in the ingredient baskets, starting with the appetizer round, when they have to make gefilte fish work with something super sweet and something soft and salty. The judges are excited to see a beautiful pork product in the entree basket, but will the chefs treat it right? And a particularly strange collection of ingredients in the dessert basket leaves the remaining two chefs scrambling to solve the final culinary puzzle.

Pork on the Brain

Everyone goes hog wild in the Chopped Kitchen as the chefs take on a pork-themed competition. The first basket threatens to contain too much of a good thing, and a beautiful cut of heritage-breed pork is juxtaposed with a questionable canned product in the entree round, sending the chefs in some creative directions with their dishes. While they would have welcomed bacon in round three, the finalists must make use of more unusual porky items in their desserts.

Grill Masters: Finale Showdown

Four Grill Masters champions representing their regional styles -- Texas, Memphis, North Carolina and Kansas City -- return to compete in this do-or-die grand finale with $50,000 and an enormous amount of pride on the line. A wild, smoky ingredient in the first basket kicks things off, and then the judges expect magnificent meat-and-potatoes entree plates from the three remaining champs. The adrenaline-filled grand finale dessert round featuring sugary, festive ingredients will decide which champion can pull off a sweet victory and walk away with the prize.

Cake Walk?

The chefs find carrot cake in the first basket, along with an unusual seafood product: Will they be able to pull together cohesive appetizers? In the entree round, the competitors take three different approaches with a familiar protein, but the judges are disappointed by the chefs' scant usage of a prized ingredient. Pop goes the dessert round, with caramel corn in the basket.


20 Cookbooks Coming Out This Fall That We Can’t Wait to Get Our Hands On

One of the small joys I’ve found in this no-good, very-bad year is cookbooks. More specifically, Kitchn’s Cookbook Club. When things feel bleak, I know I can visit our club’s Facebook group and find someone gleefully talking about a new favorite recipe they discovered in one of the books we’ve featured. I, like many of you, have been cooking way more this year. And while there have admittedly been times when I’d rather eat a week’s worth of frozen pizzas than fire up the stove again, it’s also been an everyday pleasure in a time where that feels harder to find.

This is all a long way of saying I was particularly excited for fall cookbook season this year — not only because the lineup is stacked, but also because cookbooks have taken on a new role in my life. Maybe you can relate? In collaboration with all the other Kitchn staffers and editors, we came up with this list of the 20 cookbooks we can’t wait to get our hands on. There’s work from Ina Garten, Nik Sharma, Nadiya Hussain, Yotam Ottolenghi, and so many more incredible authors. And while we haven’t read or cooked our way through many of these (yet), it’s something we can all look forward to.

In Hawa Hassan’s debut cookbook, she presents illuminating stories and 75 recipes from the kitchens of bibis (grandmothers) from eight African countries that border the Indian ocean. Each chapter highlights a different country, and starts with a brief history of the nation and an interview with one of the bibis who lives there. The book looks absolutely stunning, with photographs shot on location. Recipes include things like ground chickpea stew, and stewed plantains with beans and beef. I can’t wait to cook and read my way through this one!

Modern Comfort Food: A Barefoot Contessa Cookbook by Ina Garten (October 6)
The Barefoot Contessa — the patron saint of cooking, the queen of the stove (and our hearts) — has a cookbook coming out this fall. What more do I need to say? In Ina Garten’s 12th cookbook, she shares 85 recipes for things we could all use more of right now: comfort food. How did she know? “This book is devoted to helping you serve up seriously satisfying and delicious food that will feed not only cravings but also your soul,” she writes in the introduction. The book includes things like cheddar and chutney grilled cheese sandwiches Boston cream pie and roasted sausages, peppers, and onions.

The pie master herself, Erin Jeanne McDowell is finally gracing us with her epic tome. The book has all your basics: how to get flaky pie crust, how to store and freeze your pies, the best tips for decorating, and more. And the recipes range from classics, to new favorites, like blood orange brûlée pie and dulce de leche chess pie. Basically, if you have an affinity for pies, you need this book.


Dunkin' Donuts donuts

There's something weird going on with Dunkin' Donuts, but wait. they're not Dunkin' Donuts anymore, are they? In September 2018, corporate announced they were going to be officially changing their name to just Dunkin', with all merchandise and signage changing with the start of 2019.

That's sort of appropriate, because if you ask some employees, they'll say one of the things you should never order from Dunkin' is their donuts. Why? Part of the biggest reason was summed up like this on a Reddit thread: ". I used to work at a Dunkin' Donuts. I'm sorry my fellow East Coasters, but all of these donuts come frozen in a box and are 'baked' for 30 seconds."

Yikes. We all know there's nothing that can possibly compare to a freshly-baked donut, and if you've ever gotten one that tastes a little, well, old from Dunkin', that might be why. And that dirty little secret of the frozen donut was confirmed by another employee interviewed by PopSugar.

"Hell, the ones in my store came shipped frozen only to be baked later. That's not quality," he says.

That's both strange and sad, too, because Dunkin' has made such a big deal out of their donuts for so long that they're literally the reason "donut" became the favored spelling. They built their image on the baker who dragged himself out of bed every morning, muttering, "It's time to make the donuts," and in turn, on the image of fresh, made-in-house donuts. So how true is the claim?

Well, it turns out that not all Dunkin' locations have gone the way of the frozen donut. But even if your location doesn't serve frozen donuts, its pretty likely that they're still not exactly fresh.

In 2014, Chicago Business went behind-the-scenes at Dunkin's largest donut factory. The building is a huge section of an industrial estate in Bedford Park, and people flying in or out of the Midway International Airport actually fly over the donut factory — perhaps not even knowing that's where their "freshly-made" breakfast had been created. It isn't the only factory, but it is the largest, a 100,000-square-foot facility that makes more than 90 million donuts every year and ships them to Dunkin' locations all over.

Strangely, the factory was fairly new at the time. It was built in 2011, when 39 Dunkin' franchisees chipped in to consolidate their donut-making process into one massive location. One-third of the building, they say, is filled to the brim with bakers' racks of donuts. The rest is home not just to the baking operations, but the decoration operations as well. They made everything from Dunkin's standard, year-round varieties to those seasonal favorites, and that. sort of makes donut-lovers everywhere a bit sad.

Donuts at Dunkin' are being increasingly pushed to the wayside in favor of a growing coffee trade, and at the time franchisees decided to outsource their donuts, those same donuts made up less than half of their revenue. Small kitchens in independent locations are expensive to run and maintain, so it was a logical business decision to make.

So, how fresh are the donuts? Workers start their daily shift at 3 p.m., bake and decorate thousands of donuts, and then those tasty pastries are loaded onto delivery trucks by midnight. Trucks make the daily delivery to Dunkin' locations, and off-load the donuts before the stores open.

So, long story short? Those donuts that look mass-produced absolutely are, and they may be worse for you than you think.

In 2018, Cooking Light did some digging into just what went into a Dunkin' donut. You might assume that with factories making them daily, they might not need all the crazy, unpronounceable ingredients you'd get from other donuts.

You can make donuts at home with just seven ingredients: milk, flour, butter, sugar, yeast, salt, and eggs. That's it! Dunkin' uses more than 30 ingredients just for a basic glazed donut, and that seems unnecessary.

The list includes things like dextrose (which is nothing more than added sugar), guar and xanthan gums (for texture), and strangely, something called enzyme. That's an additive that extends the shelf life of a product, and isn't an extended-life donut the exact opposite of what you want?

There's also artificial flavors on the ingredient list for many donuts. Dunkin' did promise to get rid of artificial dyes, but it seems they only went halfway on the "artificial" front.

And here's the final catch. No one expects donuts to be super-healthy, but no one expects them to be quite as bad for you as Dunkin's are. That's in part thanks to one particular ingredient: palm oil. Palm oil is the stuff that's getting a lot of attention for its environmental impacts, particularly in the rainforests of Southeast Asia. Dunkin' made a commitment to use only 100 percent sustainable palm oil, but here's the thing — it's still one of the worst oils for you. It's high in saturated fat, it's not heart-healthy by any stretch of the imagination, and seriously, if you have to have a donut, don't you want one that's at least fresh and not terrible for you? Skip this one, no matter how tempting the sprinkles.


Comment

Equipment
Primo Oval xl

Slow n Sear (two)
Drip n Griddle
22" Weber Kettle
26" Weber Kettle one touch
Blackstone 36” Pro Series
Sous vide machine
Kitchen Aid
Meat grinder
sausage stuffer
5 Crock Pots
Akootrimonts
Two chimneys (was 3 but rivets finally popped, down to 1)
cast iron pans,
Dutch ovens
Signals 4 probe, thermapens, chef alarms, Dots, thermapop and maverick T-732, RTC-600, pro needle and various pocket instareads.
The help and preferences
1 extra fridge and a deep chest freezer in the garage
KBB
FOGO
A 9 year old princess foster child
Patience and old patio furniture
"Baby Girl" The cat

Ya’ll just move to Huntington/Newport Beach and not worry about it. Haven’t you seen the news? There’s no Virus here.

Jerod, masks in the kitchen ain’t no fun either. Ugh!

also I’ve tried “cat crap” on my glasses with “some” success for the walk in/freezer.


Wine Authenticity

Counterfeiting of wine has occurred for centuries, but since the 1990s both rumors of counterfeit wines and cases of fraud associated with wine increased drastically. Some believe that wine counterfeiting is a multi-million dollar industry associated with organized crime. Both the FBI and Scotland Yard have investigated cases of crime fraud. Industry experts estimate that about 5% of all wine sold is counterfeited.

A variety of testing methods can be used to ensure the authenticity of wine. Along with more traditional methods of inspection, chemical assays such as stable isotope analysis, chromatography , mineral content analysis, and DNA fingerprinting are being used by various wineries. A novel method that incorporates unique DNA codes into the label of wine bottles is also used to avoid counterfeiting.

Wine fraud occurs in many different forms. Often counterfeiters target the more expensive and older wines. Not only are sales of these wines financially profitable, but few people are familiar with the labels and other markings on these bottles so the fraud is harder to detect. Auctioneers and resellers sell expensive wines in large quantities, so the contents of a bottle or a case can be tampered with without anyone noticing for some time. One of the easiest scams involves replacing the contents of a case of expensive wine with bottles of less expensive wine. The cases are sold at auction houses without ever being opened and then stored for years in warehouses before being sold again. By the time someone decides to verify the contents, the counterfeiter is removed from the crime by both time and by layers of transaction.

Another common type of fraud involves replacing the contents of an expensive bottle of wine with a wine of a lesser quality. Using a two-pronged wine opener, corks can be removed and replaced with little damage. Capsules, which are the metal or plastic coverings sealing the corks in the bottle, can also be replicated and replaced. Recipes for duplicating expensive wines using inexpensive ingredients are known to experienced sommeliers (wine stewards) as well as counterfeiters. For example, blending a 1960 P é trus with a Pomerol can mimic a 1961 P é trus, which is one of the most expensive wines sold and usually costs more than ten times as much as the 1960. Other types of altering the contents of a wine bottle include adding sugar or other flavorings, and watering down the contents.

Blending was at the heart of a series of scandals in the Burgundy region of France in 2001. Several chateaux (vineyards) were blending burgundies with table wines from other regions of France, which is illegal. The winemakers involved confessed to making more than 10,000 cases of fraudulent wine during a ten-year period. Some of the wine was sold for as much as 300% profit.

Relabeling bottles of a less expensive wine with labels of a more expensive vintage is another common scam. In 2002 customs agents in China seized approximately 700 bottles of a wine that usually sells for $200 that had been relabeled as 1982 Chateau Lafite Rothschild, which sells for more than $5,700. The gang of counterfeiters had been selling the bottles for approximately $1,100 each.

In 1998 a wine auctioneer in Australia noticed that the bar code on some bottles of 1990 Penfolds Grange on the auction block were printed in black while genuine bottles have the code printed in red. Further investigation revealed that the labels had been forged and there were at least ten discrepancies between the original and the fake. One of the discrepancies included the misspelling of the word "pour" for "poor." Penfolds Grange 1990 is one of Australia's top wines and was named Wine of the Year by The Wine Spectator magazine in 1995. In 2005 it sells for more than $400 a bottle.

In 2000 a large wine fraud ring was broken up in Tuscany. More than 20,000 bottles of fake Tenuta San Guido 1994 and 1995 Sassicaia were discovered. Sassicaia is one of Italy's top wine producers known for its Super Tuscan. When the storage cellars of the gang were raided, another six million bottles of fake Chianti were seized. The police were alerted when a customer became suspicious that the price for the wine was too low. The counterfeiters tried to convince the customer that the original sale of the wine had fallen through and so they needed to sell it at a special price. Twelve people were arrested in connection with the incident.

A variety of techniques are used to determine the authenticity of wine. Traditional techniques involve careful observation of the bottle, its labels and its contents. This requires familiarity with both the wine and experience detecting counterfeits. Novel techniques of authentication rely on biochemical methods including stable isotope analysis, chromatography, mineral content analysis, and DNA fingerprinting.

General observation of the parts of the wine bottle and experience with wines are fundamental to the detection of counterfeit wines. The type of glass used to make the bottle should be consistent with the time period. Glass making has changed throughout the years and the type and manufacture of glass used should reflect these changes. The capsule should be consistent in color and markings with other examples from the same vintage. The corks should also be inspected. Since 1970, corks have been printed with the correct vintage and brand. Prior to 1970, casks were often shipped to resellers, who corked bottles themselves, so they may have printed their own corks. Labels may show damage such as peeling and staining, especially in older wines stored in the proper humid conditions. When old wines have labels in perfect condition, it may be a sign of relabeling. Spelling errors and font changes are key indicators of fraud. Wines that are imported into the United States have strip labels that show the name of the importer. These should also be consistent with the wine.

As grapes grow, they incorporate atoms of hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen from their environment into proteins and carbohydrates. Each of these elements exists in more than one form called stable isotopes. Stable isotopes have the same number of protons and electrons but different numbers of neutrons. For example, carbon has two stable isotopes: one of them has 12 neutrons in the nucleus and the other has 13. The stable isotopes of carbon are referred to as 12 C and 13 C, respectively. About 98.9% of all carbon is 12 C, while 1.1% is 13 C, however these ratios change depending on geographic region and weather conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to measure the stable isotope ratios of hydrogen in the alcohol of wines. Isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) is used to measure the stable isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen.

Grapes grown in different regions during different years have different ratios of stable isotopes and these ratios remain constant when the grapes are processed into wine. The European Union houses a database containing the stable isotope ratios from all of its wine growing regions measured each year. Determination of stable isotope ratios from a bottle of wine can be compared to the values in the database in order to determine the origin of the grapes used to make the wine.

Chromatography is a technique that involves separating the components of a mixture, such as wine. An extremely sensitive form of chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) can measure the relative quantities of the pigments, called anthocyanins, which give wine its red color. The ratio of two particular forms of anthocyanin is often used as an indicator of the type of grape used to make the wine. Evidence shows that the ratio of these two forms of anthocyanin is determined by the genetic composition of the grapes and therefore indicates the type of grape used to make the wine. However, some chemists believe that concentrations of anthocyanin in wine are affected by processing. They have found that length of fermentation, exposure to varying temperatures and the addition of enzymes, can affect the anthocyanin ratios.

When grapes grow, they incorporate small amounts of metals from the soil into their skin and pulp. These metals are called trace metals and they include aluminum, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, strontium, and zinc, among others. The concentration of these metals varies from location to location and so the concentrations of these metals incorporated into grapes varies depending on where they are grown.

In 2004 researchers from the University of Seville, Spain, developed a method to identify the trace metal composition of sparkling wines. They used atomic spectrophotometers to determine the elemental composition of the wine based on patterns of absorption of electromagnetic waves. Samples of cava from Spain and champagne from France were compared. The two wines are made using identical processes, but the regions from which the grapes originate differ. As a result, the trace mineral content also differs. For example, the ratio of strontium to zinc was always greater than 1 in cava and always less than 1 in champagne. The researchers showed that using the concentrations of 16 different trace minerals , they could identify the regional identity of the wine with perfect accuracy.

In the late 1990s a group of researchers from the University of California, Davis, developed a method to identify wine-grapes based on their genetic characteristics. They identified 17 different regions of DNA that varied greatly between different grape varieties. Collaborating with a research team from Montpellier, France, they assembled a database of genetic profiles for 300 different wine-grape varieties. In 2005, the database was expanded to include the more than 2,500 varieties of wine-grapes in existence.

Beginning in 2005 the research group in Montpellier began developing methods to perform DNA fingerprinting on wine. Using techniques similar to those used to study DNA from mummies , they believe that they will be able to extract and purify enough DNA from wine to compare it to the database of grape-wine genetic markers. Some scientists are skeptical of the technique however. Wine-grapes are heavily processed during the wine making process and the DNA may be too damaged to analyze.

In 2001 an Australian wine company, BRL Hardy, began labeling their wine with ink laced with DNA as a security measure against tampering. The technology was developed by a company called DNA Technologies for use in labeling souvenirs from the 2000 Sydney Olympics. DNA Technologies extracted DNA from one of BRL Hardy's 125-year-old grape vines. A segment of the vine DNA is then coated with a protective protein and imbedded into the neck label of the wine. Along with the DNA, optical taggants that emit unique spectral signatures in the presence of the proper excitation wavelengths are incorporated into the label. A handheld electronic scanner can then be used to test for the presence of the DNA label. BRL Hardy believes that the technology will discourage counterfeiting of its wines.

see also Analytical instrumentation DNA fingerprint DNA sequences, unique Fluorescence Soils.


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