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Risotto with Beetroot Greens recipe

Risotto with Beetroot Greens recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Main course
  • Risotto

Sometimes at farmer's markets you find really fresh beetroots with leaves that haven't yet wilted. It takes a while and you have to stand at the cooker the whole time stirring, but it's definitely worth the effort.

10 people made this

IngredientsServes: 4

  • Leaves from 1-2 bunches beetroots (5-6 handfuls of chopped leaves)
  • 5 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 litre chicken stock, simmering
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 175g Arborio rice
  • 75ml dry white wine
  • 50g of freshly grated Parmesan cheese
  • salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste

MethodPrep:10min ›Cook:40min ›Ready in:50min

  1. Wash the beetroot leaves thoroughly and chop finely. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a large pan and fry the garlic for 2 minutes over a medium heat. Mix in the leaves and cook for 4-5 minutes until they being to fall apart. Set aside.
  2. Heat the remaining 4 tablespoons of oil in a heavy-bottomed pan. Fry the shallots and add the bay leaf. Add the rice to the pan and stir well so that it is evenly coated with the oil. Cook for 2-3 minutes until the rice is toasted. Deglaze with white wine.
  3. Prepare the hot chicken stock. Pour 125ml of it into the rice and cook gently over a medium heat. As soon as the stock has boiled off, add the next 125ml and so on and so forth, until after 30 minutes the entire litre of stock has been used. The mixture should always cook gently. It's very important to keep stirring and to keep passing the wooden spoon over the bottom of the pan. Arborio rice is very sticky and will stick to the pan easily.
  4. If all of the stock has been used, but the rice is not quite soft, add a little hot water if necessary.
  5. Mix the Parmesan cheese with the rice and fold in the beetroot greens. Season with salt and pepper and serve immediately (if you allow risotto to stand, it gets sticky).

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(8)


INGREDIENTS

1 ½ cups whole-grain (“hulled”) barley
½ cup chopped walnuts
4 to 5 cups vegetable stock or water
4 tablespoons olive oil, or more as needed
1 onion, chopped
Salt and pepper
½ cup dry white wine or water
12 ounces beets, peeled and grated
2 cups arugula, or chopped beet greens if they came with the beets

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Put the barley in a large dry skillet over medium heat. Cook, shaking the pan often, until the barley is golden and fragrant, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a bowl. Put the walnuts in the skillet and repeat the process to toast them the same way. Warm the stock or water in a medium saucepan.

2. Put the olive oil in the skillet over medium heat. When it’s hot, add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the barley and cook, stirring often, until it is glossy and coated with oil, 2 to 3 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, then add the white wine. Cook, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the liquid bubbles away.

3. Use a ladle to add the warm stock, 1 cup or so at a time, stirring after each addition. When the stock has just about evaporated, add another ladleful. The mixture should be neither soupy nor dry. Adjust the heat so the mixture bubbles and stir frequently.

4. After 20 minutes, add the beets. Continue cooking the same way, tasting the grains regularly—you want it to be tender but still with a tiny bit of crunch—it could take as long as 40 minutes to reach this stage, depending on the barley. When the barley is as tender as you’d like, add the arugula or beet greens a handful at a time, stirring until each addition is wilted. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Garnish with the walnuts, and serve hot.


GF Vegan Beet Risotto

After the creamy ruby-red beet mac 'n cheese, I had to upgrade my other favorite dish, risotto!

The recipe is simple, but takes a little time to cook it if you are aiming for that really creamy, saucy texture.

Risotto is traditionally made with a type of rice called arborio, which comes from the Arborio region of Italy and is known to contain higher levels of amylopectin starch.
Risotto is cooked slowly with stock (usually vegetable stock) which allows the amylopectin starch to be released. As a result, the rice takes on a smooth, creamy texture.

GF Vegan Beet Risotto

YIELDS 2–3 servings PREP TIME 15 min COOK TIME 25 min TOTAL TIME 40 min
  • 2 medium beets
  • 4 tbsp olive oil
  • ¾ tsp sea salt
  • 2 small shallots, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 150 g arborio rice
  • 1/2 cup vegan white wine
  • 2 tbsp nutritional yeast
  • 1 tbsp fresh thyme leaves
  • 750 ml veggie stock

Directions

1. Heat up the oven to 200°C.

2. Peel the beetroots and cut them into tiny cubes.Transfer them to a roasting tray, splash with 2 tbsp olive oil, season with salt and pepper and mix well so the oil covers all beetroot pieces.

3. Bake for about 25 mins, until tender. Set aside.

4. Using pan or pot which has a lid, heat up 2 tbsp olive oil over medium heat. Add in chopped shallots and fry until translucent, about 5 mins. Add garlic to the shallots and fry, stirring frequently, until fragrant.

5. While the shallots and garlic are sautéing, heat up your stock in a small pot. Keep it warm until you have to add it to the risotto.

6. Mix the rice to the shallots and stir for about 2 minutes, so every piece is covered with oil.

7. Then stir in the beetroot cubes, white wine, nutritional yeast, salt, pepper and thyme. Cook off the wine and start to add in the hot veggie stock in small portions. About 2 tbsp at a time.

8. Keep adding the stock in small amount while stirring the risotto frequently. Always wait until the liquid is absorbed before you add in the next amount. Keep cooking like this for about 15–20 minutes, until the rice is al dente (has a small amount to bite to it when you taste it, almost done).

9. Just then turn off the heat, cover the pot and let it rest for 5 more minutes before serving.


Instructions

Try this show-stopping risotto and you’ll never go back to plain rice recipes. With golden beets, beet greens, freshly-grated parmesan, and goat cheese, its one of our most prized risottos.

Step 1
In small saucepan, bring broth and bay leaves to boil reduce heat to low to maintain heat.

Step 2
Heat 2 tbsp oil in large skillet set over medium heat cook onion, beets, 1/2 tsp salt and pepper for 5 to 8 minutes or until beets are slightly softened. Add rice cook, stirring, for about 2 minutes or until rice is well coated. Add wine cook, stirring constantly, for 2 to 3 minutes or until most of the liquid is absorbed.

Step 3
Remove and discard bay leaves from broth. Add broth, 1 cup at a time, stirring constantly, until all broth is absorbed, rice is creamy, and rice and beets are tender, about 20 to 25 minutes (if risotto is dry, add more broth or water). Stir in Parmesan.

Step 4
Meanwhile, heat remaining oil in separate skillet set over medium heat cook garlic for 1 to 2 minutes or until fragrant. Stir in beet greens, and remaining salt and pepper cook for 3 to 5 minutes or until beet greens are wilted.

Step 5
Divide risotto among 4 bowls. Top with beet greens and goat cheese.

Nothing ‘Beets’ This Risotto

Don’t skip a beet! Make the most of your favorite authentic rice and cook up this scrumptious beet risotto with golden beets and goat cheese. Also made with earthy beet greens, this risotto is as colorful as it is tasty! Don’t believe us? Well, let’s discuss ingredients then.

Starting with a tasty base of sweet onions and golden beets, this recipe doesn’t skimp on flavor. After cooking down the veggies, this risotto combines savory and sweety with a dash of white wine.

In addition to the comforting taste of aromatic bay leaves and lovely bites of tangy goat cheese, this recipe calls for fresh beet greens for an added bite to an already incredible concoction.


Beet Green Risotto ♥

But for supper, this beet green risotto is absolutely delicious. And to my taste, risotto is a perfect Friday-night supper, a bridge between the work week and the weekend. I pour a glass of wine and start to cook, stirring-stirring (but don't worry, there's time to make a salad and send someone to the grill). By the time the risotto's ready, I'm relaxed and ready to relax.

Until recently, I've always thought of risotto as 'fancy' and 'time intensive' food, something saved for special occasions. What I've learned is that once you nail the basic technique, it's extraordinarily simple and versatile. And delicious!! I've been testing risotto for an upcoming Kitchen Parade column and what you see below has become my standard 'recipe' for vegetable risottos. It worked beautifully with the ruby-colored beet stems and life-green beet greens.

RISOTTO RICE
Arborio is the rice usually specified for risotto. Tonight I experimented with "carnaroli rice", which Whole Foods describes, "Carnaroli rice offers a thick, rather short grain that is slightly firmer than Arborio. The darling of chefs, Carnaroli is less popular with farmers. It's harder to cultivate than other varieties, and its long, hair-like stem at the end of the stalk, called an "arista," makes harvesting difficult." At Global Foods (my neighborhood international market) it was slightly more expensive. I'm not sure I noticed a difference.

SERVING SIZE
The serving size here is smaller than elsewhere. Other main-dish risotto recipes call for 2 uncooked cups of rice to serve four, a side dish serving is based on 1 cup for four servings -- HUGE servings.

My recipe calls for 1/2 cup of rice for four servings -- but always includes bulk from vegetable sources. And it's supper in just three points. (Please do not think that other risottos, especially restaurant risottos, are made in three points for they're notorious for fat amounts of butter and Parmesan.)

I find it plenty, though often it tastes so good I'm tempted to eat the pot! But to test the size on your family, think about making sure there's a big salad served alongside, or serve the risotto with grilled vegetables or meat. Still, I do hope you'll test the idea and let me know what you think.

FREE COOKBOOKS! During April, win free cookbooks at A Veggie Venture! It's all to celebrate the Alphabet of Vegetables, the brand-new A - Z of Vegetables with easy links to great vegetable recipes! Need an example? Check all the spring asparagus recipes.

TWO YEARS AGO Baked Beets Late April must be beet season!

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BEET GREEN RISOTTO

2 1/2 cups chicken broth (I'm happy with bouillon)
1 tablespoon butter
1 onion, diced small
Stems from 3 beets, trimmed and diced small
1/2 cup risotto rice (Arborio is typical)
1/2 cup white wine (or champagne, as tonight)
Salt & pepper to taste

The leaves from 3 beets, layered, rolled up into 'cigars' and then sliced very thin
1 teaspoon white wine vinegar (don't skip this, adds brightness)
1/2 cup Parmesan, grated (from about two square inches, I think it's two ounces)

In a small pot, bring stock to a boil, adjust heat to maintain a slow simmer.

In a non-stick skillet, melt the butter til shimmery, stir in the onion as it's prepped, stirring to coat. Add the stems as they're prepped, stirring to coat. Cook vegetables til they're beginning to soften. Add the rice and stir to coat, let cook for 1 - 2 minutes, stirring almost continuously. Add the white wine (it should sizzle) and stir til rice absorbs the liquid. A half cup at a time, add hot stock to the rice, stirring to incorporate, letting each addition get absorbed and the rice getting almost dry before adding more. (Stir very regularly during this process. You'll have time to make a salad, etc, just stay close to the stove so that you can watch what's happening and react quickly.) As the rice plumps up, begin tasting a grain or two for done-ness and seasoning. Risotto is supposed to be cooked only to the point that there remains a 'germ' in the center I like it cooked past that point, more like 'rice'. To get to either stage, you may not need all the broth. If the rice needs salt and pepper, start seasoning it now, but go gently.

Stir in the beet greens (this is done late so they'll only cook a minute or two and retain their color) and the vinegar. Stir until greens are cooked. Stir in Parmesan. Serve immediately.

NUTRITION ESTIMATE
Per Serving: 194 Cal (33% from Fat, 16% from Protein, 51% from Carb) 8 g Protein 7 g Tot Fat 4 g Sat Fat 24 g Carb 2 g Fiber NetCarb 22 198 mg Calcium 1 mg Iron 648 mg Sodium 17 mg Cholesterol Weight Watchers 3 points


Black Rice and Arborio Risotto With Beets and Beet Greens

The red from the beets will bleed into the white rice in this nutrient-dense risotto. Both the beets and the black rice contribute anthocyanins, flavonoids with antioxidant properties.

1 cup black rice, like Lundberg Black Japonica or Forbidden Rice, cooked (3 cups cooked black rice)

1 quart chicken or vegetable stock, as needed

1 bunch beet greens, stemmed and washed

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup finely chopped onion

3/4 pound beets (1 bunch small), roasted, skinned and diced

1 to 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated (1/4 to 1/2 cup, to taste, optional)

2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

1. To cook the black rice, combine with 2 cups water in a saucepan, add salt to taste and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat, cover and simmer 30 to 40 minutes, until all of the liquid has been absorbed by the rice. Remove from the heat, remove the lid from the pan and place a dish towel over the pan, then return the lid. Let sit for 10 to 15 minutes.

2. Bring the stock to a simmer in a saucepan. Season well and turn the heat to low. Stack the stemmed, washed greens and cut crosswise into 1-inch-wide strips.

3. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large nonstick frying pan or wide, heavy saucepan and add the onion. Cook, stirring, until the onion begins to soften, about 3 minutes, and add the rice and garlic. Cook, stirring, until the grains of rice are separate and beginning to crackle, about 3 minutes.

4. Stir in the wine and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly. The wine should bubble, but not too quickly. You want some of the flavor to cook into the rice before it evaporates. When the wine has just about evaporated, stir in a ladleful or two of the simmering stock (about 1/2 cup), enough to just cover the rice. The stock should bubble slowly (adjust heat accordingly). Cook, stirring often, until it is just about absorbed. Add another ladleful or two of the stock and continue to cook in this fashion, not too fast and not too slowly, stirring often and adding more stock when the rice is almost dry, for 10 minutes.

5. Stir in the greens, the diced beets and black rice and continue adding more stock, enough to barely cover the rice, and stirring often, for another 10 to 15 minutes. The arborio rice should be chewy but not hard in the middle – and definitely not soft like steamed rice. If it is still hard in the middle, you need to continue adding stock and stirring for another 5 minutes or so. Now is the time to ascertain if there is enough salt. Add if necessary.

6. When the rice is cooked through, add a generous amount of freshly ground pepper, and stir in another ladleful of stock, the Parmesan and the parsley. Remove from the heat. The risotto should be creamy if it isn’t, add a little more stock. Stir once, taste and adjust seasonings, and serve.

Yield: 6 servings.

Advance preparation: The cooked black rice freezes well for a month and will keep in the refrigerator for 3 or 4 days. The roasted beets will keep in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days. You can blanch the greens ahead and stir them into the risotto toward the end of cooking. You can make this through Step 4 several hours ahead. Remove from the heat and spread the rice out in a thin layer in the pan. When ready to finish the dish, reheat with more stock and proceed with the recipe.

Nutritional information per serving: 280 calories 6 grams fat 1 gram saturated fat 1 gram polyunsaturated fat 4 grams monounsaturated fat 0 milligrams cholesterol 50 grams carbohydrates 6 grams dietary fiber 174 milligrams sodium (does not include salt to taste) 8 grams protein


Creamy beetroot risotto

Heat oven to 180C/fan 160C/gas 4. Peel and trim the beetroots (use kitchen gloves if you don’t want your hands to get stained) and cut into large wedges. Place on a large sheet of foil on a baking sheet. Toss with 1 tbsp olive oil, season, then cook for 1 hr until the beets are soft.

Meanwhile, heat the remaining olive oil with the butter in an ovenproof pan with a lid. Tip in the onion and garlic, then cook for 3-5 mins until translucent. Stir in the rice until well coated with the butter and oil. Pour over the white wine, then let the mixture bubble away for 5 mins.

Stir well, then pour over the stock. Stir again, cover and place in the oven. Cook for 15 mins until the rice is soft. Remove the beetroots from the oven. Whizz ¼ of them to make a purée, then chop the remainder into small pieces. Stir most of the Parmesan, the beetroot purée and chopped beetroot through the risotto, then serve with some soured cream dolloped over and the dill and extra Parmesan scattered on top.


Risotto With Beet Greens and Roasted Beets

This rich-tasting risotto is decidedly pink (maybe it will be the key to getting your picky daughter to eat vegetables!). Use a full-bodied vegetable stock if you are vegetarian otherwise use a well seasoned chicken or turkey stock.

3/4 pound beets (1 bunch small), roasted

1 bunch beet greens, stemmed and washed

6 to 7 cups chicken or vegetable stock, as needed

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

1/2 cup finely chopped onion

1 1/2 cups Arborio or Carnarolli rice

2 garlic cloves, minced or pressed

1/2 cup red, rose, or dry white wine

1 to 2 ounces Parmesan cheese, grated (1/4 to 1/2 cup, to taste)

2 tablespoons finely chopped flat-leaf parsley

1. Bring the stock to a simmer in a saucepan. Season well and turn the heat to low. Stack the stemmed, washed greens and cut crosswise into 1-inch wide strips.

2. Heat the oil over medium heat in a large nonstick frying pan or wide, heavy saucepan and add the onion. Cook, stirring, until the onion begins to soften, about 3 minutes, and add the rice and garlic. Cook, stirring, until the grains of rice are separate and beginning to crackle, about 3 minutes.

3. Stir in the wine and cook over medium heat, stirring constantly. The wine should bubble, but not too quickly. You want some of the flavor to cook into the rice before it evaporates. When the wine has just about evaporated, stir in a ladleful or two of the simmering stock (about 1/2 cup), enough to just cover the rice. The stock should bubble slowly (adjust heat accordingly). Cook, stirring often, until it is just about absorbed. Add another ladleful or two of the stock and continue to cook in this fashion, not too fast and not too slowly, stirring often and adding more stock when the rice is almost dry, for 10 minutes.

4. Stir in the greens and the diced beets, and continue adding more stock, enough to barely cover the rice, and stirring often, for another 10 to 15 minutes. Taste a bit of the rice. Is it cooked through? It should taste chewy but not hard in the middle. Definitely not soft like steamed rice. If it is still hard in the middle, you need to continue adding stock and stirring for another 5 minutes or so. Now is the time to ascertain if there is enough salt. Add if necessary.

5. When the rice is cooked through, add a generous amount of freshly ground pepper, and stir in another half cup of stock, the Parmesan and the parsley. Remove from the heat. The rice should be creamy if it isn’t, add a little more stock. Stir once, taste and adjust seasonings, and serve.

Variation: I often blanch greens when I get them home from the market so that they won’t wilt or rot in the refrigerator if I don’t get around to cooking them right away. If you do this, and want to use them for this risotto, chop the blanched greens and set aside. Add them to the risotto during the last few minutes of cooking, just to heat them through and amalgamate into the dish.

Advance preparation: The roasted beets will keep for 5 days in the refrigerator. You can get ahead on the risotto, cooking it just through Step 3, then spreading the rice out in the pan or on a baking sheet. Reheat and proceed with Step 4 shortly before serving.


Quinoa Beet Risotto Recipe

In Argentina, where I live and grew up, risottos are quite popular due to the Italian heritage in the area. And beyond risottos, many of our dishes have a strong Italian influence, e.g., pasta and gourmet pizza recipes are numerous. Yet it is risotto that I always loved since childhood, as it’s originally made with rice, and I could live on rice. Riso actually means rice in Italian, so risotto would be rice cooked to a creamy consistency.

Quinoa reminds me of a beautiful trip I once did to Peru, mother land of this grain. Actually not a true grain but a protein-rich seed, quinoa is nevertheless used, cooked and eaten as a grain.

My first encounter with this seed was 11 years ago, on my first trip to Peru, ancient land of “Kinwa”, its original name transliterated from Quechua [people of the central Andes and their language]. We were in the north of Argentina, Salta to be precise. My brother and a couple of friends were going to do a two-week trip to the ruins of Machu Pichu, through Bolivia and all the way up into Peru. So my cousin and I asked permission to join which was luckily granted. Through the most uncivilized parts of Bolivia, travelling on the worst public transport ever, with bad smelling chickens all around and even on us, the “Cholas” [women with Indian blood] didn’t respect us at all. Sitting on the floor of an old deteriorated bus, our journey started.

In Bolivia, we would always eat on the streets or at local markets. The streets are usually packed with food stands around stations, even very early in the morning when it’s still dark, you can see warm vapor coming out of the stands, where the common food would be chicken soup with rice. It was only by mid Bolivia where we got off the bus and people were buying at this one stand that had nothing similar to chicken soup. People were walking away with a small double plastic bag and a straw dipped in, sipping some kind of hot juice. I was so amazed by the way they were in line just waiting for the juice and sipping it out of little bags. So I went over to buy one. I then found out it was a typical mountain breakfast, as it can get cold in the mornings. It was nothing but a Kinwa, apple and cinnamon “soup-juice”. To which they said, why take coffee? Kinwa is what you need for an energetic start. So there I was having my first kinwa breakfast, which by the way, tasted delicious.

After some days, having the soup in the mornings or in warmer climates like Cusco in southern Peru, puffed amaranth and Kinwa bars (handmade by locals, with nothing but that and a little unrefined sugar, combined with fresh orange juice blended with the tonic herb maca), made our journey light and easy no need for anything else even on 3-4 hour morning walks. These really felt like “super” foods, as they are now called.

Quinoa (Kinwa) is a seed used all around Peru and Bolivia. Originally grown in the Andes, it has been the staple food of the ancient Incas, who have walked the mountains and worked the land for centuries.

In Chinese healing arts, we can say that quinoa builds the Kidney Yang energy. The Kidneys are said to keep us alive, as they are our reservoir of essence through life. This essence is what ancient Chinese called Jing. I usually say it’s the like the “fuel storage tank” we bring to earth the day we are born. How we use it and take care of it will determine our health and lifespan. So eating foods that nourish the kidneys and their Jing is always good, as it will help us keep our vitality up, helps with reproduction and longevity and keeps us in balance with the earth and its Yin calming qualities.

The high protein content of quinoa makes it an appropriate food for those on a vegan or highly plant-based diet, or even on the transition to eating fewer and better quality animal products.

Colors in food many times tell us about the nature and effect of those foods in our bodies. It can be according the “Five Element” theory, like green mung beans, string beans and fresh green peas are some the best legumes to nurture and detoxify the liver. This color and organ relationship comes from the fact that liver corresponds to the Wood Element, which is affected by the color green. Or it can be also according to substances in our bodies. In this case, the red-purplish color of beets, reminds us of blood. Likewise beets are very cleansing for the liver and blood, as well as tonifying for the heart. Beets also promote menstruation and boost blood circulation. The effect of beets on these two organs–the Liver and Heart—make them especially appropriate to eat during spring and summer. [Spring corresponds to the Liver, and summer to the Heart, in classical Chinese healing theory.]

So why “Quinoa Beet Risotto”? Well, this dish brings together a little of my history and lifestyle. Here are some pieces of that history: loving risottos since my earliest memories eating into a healthy plant-based lifestyle boosting my energy with quality vegetable protein and taking good care of my heart, a deficiency in my younger years. I’ve experimented with risotto recipes like the one below for some years. Lately, I teach that same recipe at my 𔄝 Element Cooking Courses” in Argentina. It’s so creamy and yet extra fresh–you´ll love it.

Something special I usually do with this recipe is make some extra “beet pâté”—puree cooked beets with a little olive or flax oil, lemon juice and a dash of ground black pepper. You can keep it in the fridge and use it as a dipping sauce, to put over grains, legumes, salads, toast or bread, or anything you can imagine. Enjoy.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 medium beet, peeled and quartered
  • 2 cups loosely packed beet greens, stems trimmed
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 cups vegetable broth
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, minced
  • 1 cup arborio rice
  • 8 ounces shredded sharp cheddar cheese (2 cups)
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, for serving

Place the beet in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Add the beet greens and pulse until finely chopped.

In a medium saucepan, bring the water and vegetable broth to a simmer. Heat the oil in a large saucepan. Add the onion and cook over moderately high heat, stirring, until softened, 3 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Stir in the beets and beet greens and cook for 1 minute. Add the broth to the large saucepan, 1 cup at a time, and cook over moderate heat, stirring, until the liquid is nearly absorbed between additions, 20 minutes. Add the cheddar season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring until the risotto is creamy and thick, 3 minutes longer. Serve in deep bowls, passing the Parmigiano-Reggiano on the side.



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